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    Planning a wedding can take nearly a year, and the Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce hopes to give couples a start on the process with the 20th Annual Central Sussex Bridal Show.

    “A Platinum Affair” will be held in the Millsboro Town Center on Sunday, March 15, from noon to 3 p.m. Admission to the show costs $5 per person, with brides-to-be admitted free of charge.

    Chamber Executive Director Amy Simmons said the show will feature more than 30 vendors, ranging from professional photographers to wedding caterers, hair salons, caterers and more.

    “We have pretty much everything, in one way or another, for a wedding… We’ve had some vendors who have been coming all 20 years.”

    During the day, two fashion shows will be presented, by Candelight Bridal and Amore Bridal, showcasing fashions for brides, mothers-of-the-bride, bridesmaids, flower girls and prom.

    Simmons thanked Chardon Jewelers, the Voice Radio and Rehoboth Hampton Inn for sponsoring the event this year. She added that Rehoboth Hampton Inn would be giving away the grand prize at the show: a two-night stay, with dinner for two in Rehoboth, along with a honeymoon basket in the room. She noted that other door prizes will be given away throughout the day, provided by participating vendors.

    As this year marks the 20th year of the show, Simmons said, “There are going to be surprises along the way” to mark the occasion.

    “We’re going to be giving out some little drinks as the brides come in, compliments of the Chamber. We wanted to make it a little special this year.”

    Simmons said she hopes the show will have a good turnout and great weather, and that brides-to-be leave with lots of information to help them plan their dream weddings.

    “It has withstood the test of time. Twenty years is a long time in this area for something to run, and run successfully. People return year after year… I just think it’s great. It’s a great event, a happy time for the brides, and we just enjoy doing it. It’s just a great day.”

    The Millsboro Town Center is located at 322 Wilson Highway in downtown Millsboro. For more information, call the Greater Millsboro Chamber of Commerce at (302) 934-6777 or visit www.millsborochamber.com.


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    “My story starts when I had a stroke in 2006. My life on dialysis started one year later. I was a dialysis patient for five years. My passion as a patient advocate is what kept me going. The other motivation was that one day I would receive a kidney.

    “This is where my donor decided at some point of his life to give up his kidneys so that someone else could get off of the burden of dialysis. His sacrifice gave me new life. I am happy to report that the kidney is alive and functioning well. My fit to the donor was perfect.

    “So how do you thank someone for this wonderful gift? My only thought was to write this letter and speak like my donor was right here in front of me. I would say to my donor that there are no words to express my gratitude. Your kindness to think of others is a trait that I can learn from. May God bless you and I am sure he holds you in his best place in heaven. You were truly my angel. So rest well my friend and I hope that one day we could resume this conversation up in heaven.

    “My Angel Up in Heaven — Pat”

    After being on dialysis for four hours a day, three days a week for five years, Pasquale “Pat” Dangelantonio was finally able to get a kidney transplant on Dec. 5, 2014, from a cadaver donor at the University of Pennsylvania.

    “This particular fellow was 62 years old. The family didn’t want any information given out, so I wrote a letter to the guy and gave it to his family — my way of saying ‘Thank you.’”

    Dangelantonio, a former aerospace engineer, is now trying to help terrestrial beings, by raising money and awareness for the National Kidney Foundation.

    This Saturday, March 14, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dangelantonio and his neighbors in Plantation Lakes will be holding a luncheon fundraiser and bake sale to raise money for the NKF.

    For $5, attendees can enjoy fresh-made corned beef and cabbage, or a hotdog and chips for $3.

    The bake sale will include goodies that everyone can enjoy — even Fido.

    “A lot of the residents are going to bake cakes, brownies and cookies,” said Sheri-Ann Cohen, who organized the event. “We’re also going to have doggie treats, as well, because dogs are important, too.”

    The event will also include a raffle in which attendees have the chance of winning such goodies as gift certificates to Giant and Jake’s Wayback Burgers, as well as a bird feeder.

    “This is the first year we’re doing it,” said Cohen, who was approached by Dangelantonio to help organize the fundraiser. “We’re a close-knit community, and we want to give back. This is our first fundraising event that we’re actually having at our community center.”

    Dangelantonio said Nicole Scharf of the National Kidney Foundation will have an educational table set up at the fundraiser.

    “She’ll be there to talk if anyone wants some information, because we do have an older community. I think it would be a real good thing for her to talk to some of these folks.”

    Dangelantonio said the whole Plantation Lakes community has gotten involved in the fundraiser.

    “We got the whole community involved — we put flyers out, went door-to-door. The people in this community who have come together to help me — it just amazes me.

    I’ll be indebted to them for the rest of my life.”

    Cohen said she hopes the event is successful, so the community can make it an annual fundraiser.

    “I’m just hoping it does bring the whole neighborhood and community together for this cause, and that we do really well so we can do it again next year.”

    Dangelantonio has been an active advocate for dialysis patients and the National Kidney Foundation.

    On April 26, he’ll be participating in the Southern Delaware Kidney Walk at Cape Henlopen State Park. With more than 40 walkers on his team, Cuz’s Kidney Crusaders, Dangelantonio hopes to raise $10,000 for the foundation.

    “It’s my year to give back. Hopefully, everything will be successful.”

    He also took an active role in the passage of House Bill 360 — designed to promote the safety and welfare of the State’s growing number of patients who use dialysis centers, and requiring generators so patients would not have to hand-crank a machine in order to retrieve their blood in the event of a power outage.

    “We’re the 16th state in the nation to get that bill passed. I’m really proud of that,” he said, making note of the help from then-Rep. John Atkins, who sponsored the bill. “It was great to testify in front of the legislature. It was a highlight of my life… I got every vote in the House and in the Senate.”

    Three months into his transplant, Dangelantonio said he feels great, but constantly thinks of his fellow dialysis patients.

    “It was all worth it. It was great, and I got to give back… I left all my guys behind. I was the patient representative for my site in Millsboro and feel a responsible for them,” he said, adding, “I just want to say to my fellow dialysis patients out there that I’m praying for you every day.”

    The fundraiser will be held at the Plantation Lakes Community Center located at 29787 Plantation Lakes Boulevard in Millsboro. To donate to Dangelantonio’s National Kidney Foundation walk team, visit www.gofundme.com/kq9vy4.


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    Four candidates have thrown their hats into the ring for the April election for District 4 councilperson in Ocean View. Carol Bodine, a Wedgefield resident, hopes to win the seat, currently held by Councilman Bob Lawless, who is term-limited.

    “Six years ago, there was chaos on the council… It was all over the newspaper. I attended a meeting, and one of the councilmen threatened to call the police if anyone talked. It said on the agenda that the citizens could speak. We all left, and I thought, ‘This is ridiculous,’” she recalled.

    Bodine, along with other community members, urged Lawless to run for office, and she served as his campaign manager.

    “With his term ending, he came to me and said, ‘I think you should take my place,’” she explained. “It’s a well-organized, calm council now. You go to the meetings and speak any time — they’re just wonderful, and I want to keep it that way.”

    A proponent of low taxes and open government, Bodine said she believes she would be a good fit on the council.

    “I just want the efficiency of the council and the calmness, openness of the council and the low taxes to remain.”

    With Lawless acting as her campaign manager this time around, Bodine said she has been attending council meetings and workshops to learn more about what is facing the town. She also believes that in doing so, if she is elected, the knowledge she has gained will help make the transition an easy one.

    “The other thing I saw [while attending meetings]… The last female that was on the council was Michele Steffens. Prior to her, I don’t know of any females serving on the council,” she said. “I think it would be nice to have a female perspective on things.”

    Bodine, who was born in Washington, D.C., and spent most of her life in Maryland, became a permanent Ocean View resident in 2004.

    “It was just out of the clear blue. I knew Ocean City from the time I was a teenager, but I didn’t know about the Bethany area. Someone just told me about it. I was trying to find a place that made me comfortable. I have lots of friends here and am very comfortable here.

    “Everybody in this area is just the friendliest, nicest people. I felt so comfortable down here. It didn’t take me long to get to know people.”

    When she first moved to the area, Bodine said, there was a difference in pace from the city, but it was a welcome change.

    “When I first moved down here, I was used to a fast pace because I lived in Maryland and D.C. I go in the grocery store and people are talking to the checkout lady and I’m going, ‘Oh, I gotta get out of here.’ And then I became one of the people talking at the checkout! There’s a slower pace down here, and it’s very friendly, and I don’t plan on moving again.”

    Bodine is a retired registered nurse who received her diploma degree from Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, Md. She has worked at the National Institutes of Health and Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md., and ran a nursing agency with her sister.

    “I was 13 years old, and that’s what I knew I wanted to do. I worked at Providence Hospital since I was 14 years old until I graduated from high school so I would have the money to pay for my education. I didn’t mind working, because I knew what I wanted.”

    Her daughter, Rita Meadows, followed in her footsteps, and is currently a nurse practitioner at Georgetown Medical Health, as well as working toward her doctorate.

    Bodine said she’s happy to have her daughter close by and is able to help care for her granddaughter, who has some medical conditions.

    Apart from helping care for her granddaughter, Bodine is an active member of St. Ann’s Catholic Church, singing in the choir and performing in the bell choir.

    “Everywhere you go, you should be part of that town, community or city. You get to know people that way. You make sure things are done right. And I believe in service. I don’t just attend church; I perform a service at church.”

    Bodine also serves as State Secretary for the Republican Party, which she said makes her an ideal candidate to serve Ocean View.

    “I have worked on many campaigns, and have worked for the party up and down the state,” she said. “I know that the council is bipartisan, and I intent to keep it that way,” she added.

    Bodine plans to begin campaigning this month, by going door to door to meet fellow District 4 residents. She will also have signs and cards to hand out.

    Of issues facing the town, Bodine said she knows drainage has been an ongoing issue and would work with council to continue to address concerns.

    “I definitely support the police department. They’re great. They’ll come through your neighborhood and wave. They get to know the neighborhoods and the people. I believe in low taxes and open government,” she said. “I want my town to be family-friendly. That’s one of the reasons why I like this area — Bethany Beach and Ocean View — it’s a family-friendly area.”

    The municipal election in the Town of Ocean View will be held Saturday, April 11, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at town hall.


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    South Bethany may have a budget shortfall of about $1,500 in its proposed 2016-fiscal-year budget, “but we know where to find it,” said Town Council Treasurer Tim Saxton.

    On Feb. 26, he presented to the council a “fully loaded” draft budget, which included savings, new expenses and a 4.1 percent pay increase for employees.

    The council began their meeting with a budget shortfall of about $5,149, which decreased with several changes and $2,000 from Sussex County’s $10,000 Economic Development & Infrastructure Grant to the Town.

    County grant to pay for town hall upgrades

    Mayor Pat Voveris and Councilwoman Sue Callaway said they didn’t want to just “pay a bill” with the grant money, insisting that it was intended for projects the Town couldn’t have done otherwise. But the council approved new projects that will be paid for with the rest of that grant.

    The next $4,500 of the grant will buy town hall’s audio upgrade. Councilmembers had noted how hard it is to hear and participate by remote access when they call in to meetings. The upgrade would include phones, wiring and other equipment.

    Another $2,000 from the grant will buy preliminary plans for the expansion of town hall.

    “It was free money to get the plans done. It’s up to you if and when you want to get it done,” Town Manager Mel Cusick said. “We’ve got so many meetings now — we’re juggling.”

    He described the auditor and Town committees having to share the council chambers. New space could include a small conference room, offices, storage, bathrooms or more.

    With the plans, the town council can decide whether to sock away money for future expansions.

    While Voveris said she admired the work people originally put into designing town hall, she said they couldn’t have foreseen the building hosting so many committees and town events.

    “I’m all for it,” Caputo said. “I think it’s great that this facility is used by the community so much.”

    The final $1,500 of the grant will be used for a full Town Code review.

    Voveris suggested the process involve the University of Delaware, which would do an “initial review” of Town laws and present information on any glaring problems, and their observations and recommendations. First, the UD group will submit a proposal from their review team. The council may accept it, or it may decide to use another review service.

    Collectively the council members said they didn’t want to start a lighting project on Canal Drive (which Callaway said is pitch black at night, even in popular walking areas) before they finished the current Ocean Drive project. (The grant will cover the $2,000 that the council had already set aside in the proposed budget.)

    Meanwhile, the council will further investigate whether the electric company will replace Cat Hill-area lamps for free.

    Transfer tax numbers remain fluid

    Going forward in the budget process, the council will continue discussing big-picture items, such as savings and long-term expenses. They also reviewed individual budget items.

    The council debated how much income to expect from transfer taxes, with $305,000 proposed in the draft budget.

    Historically, numbers for transfer tax revenue have been all over the place, Saxton said. This year’s transfer tax income has already hit $400,000, when $250,000 was budgeted. But that may be due to a considerable number of sales on Ocean Drive, which may not necessarily be repeated this fiscal year.

    “We had a 72 percent increase in single-family homes sold in South Bethany,” Callaway said she had heard from a local Realtor, with a 21 percent price rise in median price ($650,000) and a top price of $2.75 million.

    Temporary personnel is a new line item in the Town’s budget ($5,500), intended to ensure there is adequate coverage when Town employees go on vacation. Saxton said he was concerned that staff are getting pulled away from their daily jobs to cover other tasks.

    The hourly rate is on par with that in the Town of Rehoboth Beach, about $10.50 or $11, Cusick said.

    The council decided to plan on a lower figure for magistrate fines ($45,000) because in past years they have come to that amount when much more was budgeted.

    Caputo asked if $25,000 would be enough for the Town’s legal fees, since “it only takes one thing” for costs to skyrocket. But Cusick said insurance will kick in should that happen, and fees may be spread over multiple years.

    The council approved a 4.1 percent payroll increase, including the regular 2.5 percent step increase, plus a 1.6 percent cost-of-living adjustment.)

    “It sends an important message to employees that we appreciate them,” Callaway said. “My street was plowed at 7 a.m. I think we have come to accept that” level of service,” she added.

    South Bethany had no COLA increase last year, Voveris said. The Delaware State budget proposal has no COLA increase this year, Cusick noted.

    There is a $2,900 increase in the proposed budget for keeping a police psychiatrist on retainer, which is a standard in the area, Police Chief Troy Crowson said.

    The water quality budget includes $1,000 for community education and $5,300 for water testing with the University Maryland. (The previous lab cost less but was slow in returning results.)

    Saxton requested a philosophical discussion on the Town’s recreational events. He said he was fine with the recently created Realtor luncheon, boat parade and movie nights, as events that promote the town, encourage visitors or drive revenue.

    However, he questioned the Town’s Polar Bear Plunge team, which endorses one specific charity and had a decrease in attendance this year.

    But Callaway quickly addressed his concerns by telling the story of a new homeowner who was so excited to join the plunge team that she invited a bunch of guests for the weekend. It also gave the woman an overall “good feeling” about her new town, Callaway said.

    The council upped the budget to include $3,000 for two movie nights, after a very successful “Frozen” showing last summer.

    The council limited the Town’s Boat Parade budget to $360, eliminating a proposed $300 for an awards ceremony. Some people questioned the Town’s paying even that much for laminated numbers, prizes and mementos.

    “It’s fun!” Callaway said, and very inexpensive.

    Budget discussions will continue at the following meetings:

    • Budget & Finance Committee on Friday, March 6, at 3 p.m.

    • A public meeting on the 2016-fiscal-year draft budget on Friday, March 13, at 6 p.m.

    • The town council’s regular meeting on Friday, March 13, at 7 p.m.


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    Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Dignitaries gathered to celebrate the opening of the Mountaire Health & Wellness Center in Selbyville.Coastal Point • Laura Walter : Dignitaries gathered to celebrate the opening of the Mountaire Health & Wellness Center in Selbyville.Mountaire has always been known for poultry. Now, it wants to be known for health, too.

    The Mountaire Health & Wellness Center opened at 85 Hosier Street recently, available to all of Mountaire’s Selbyville factory workers, and their dependents, who are on company health insurance.

    “We say our employees are our most valuable asset,” said Mike Tirrell, vice president of Human Resources and Business Services. “We put our money where our mouth is.”

    “The center will be staffed by Premise Health, with one physician, one registered nurse and two medical assistants,” the company noted. “The clinic will support Mountaire’s goal to provide employees with access to high-quality health services, and promote a culture of health and wellness.”

    Previously, the Selbyville staff were allowed to use the Millsboro facility’s health center, which opened almost exactly four years ago. (The North Carolina’s facility’s health center opened last year.)

    Tirrell couldn’t say how many Selbyville employees are eligible, but “most people have our insurance. A large percentage,” he said of their employees.

    Premise Health will operate the actual clinic, providing primary care, urgent care, wellness services, immunizations and more.

    The clinic has four exam rooms (including gynecology equipment) and a procedure room (which can monitor patients during a more serious issue).

    The clinic can draw blood and send it directly to the lab, free of charge, even if a patient’s outside doctor ordered the test, said Wendy Holt, on-site nurse manager.

    “This is going to be — if the employee wants it — their primary doctor,” Holt said. An on-site physician can write referrals and prescriptions, “which is really great for the patient.”

    A lot of people don’t have a primary-care physician, even relying on the emergency room for minor but pressing issues, Tirrell said. The Mountaire facility may provide some people’s first preventative care in a long time, he added.

    Mountaire’s clinic can fill that gap, or just fill in if employees can’t get an outside appointment soon enough.

    There is no co-pay. The clinic has a bilingual staffer, plus LanguageLine.

    “The costs of healthcare are skyrocketing,” said former employee and state Sen. Brian Pettyjohn (Georgetown). “To have a facility like this, where families can come in and get … real comprehensive health care, is a great thing.”

    The Health & Wellness Center is open Monday to Friday. There are late hours Tuesday and Thursday, since employees work different shifts, too.

    “It looks so much smaller from the outside!” Holt marveled.

    This is especially good for the community, since the workers are processing raw food, said state Rep. Ruth Briggs King (Georgetown).

    “As an employee, someone who works for Mountaire, [this shows] why it’s a company that people want to be part of,” said Sean McKeon, Mountaire community relations.

    “Our goal is to provide quality and efficient healthcare services, reduce the overall cost of healthcare, and help our employees make healthy choices that will improve the quality of life for themselves and their dependents,” Tirrell added.

    Now 100 years old, Mountaire Corporation is still family-owned and based in Arkansas.


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    Earlier this week, the Town of Ocean View reviewed Draft 3 of the Town’s Operating & Capital Budget for the 2016 fiscal year, which reflected changes made following a council budget workshop.

    In Draft 3 for the Capital Budget, the budget for computer upgrades was increased to $27,000; the budget for security enhancements for the second floor was reduced to $30,000; computer upgrades for the Ocean View Police Department for a new file server were removed because it has been worked into this year’s budget; and the vehicle budget for the department was increased to $54,000.

    Town Manager Dianne Vogel said the Delaware State Pension rate for the employer cost was updated to reflect a reduction based on information the Town received from the Pension Office.

    “Dominion Dental rates were received and have increased from 2 percent to 3.4 percent, based on the actual renewal rates,” she said.

    She noted that the State would be voting on its group health insurance plan March 20.

    “It doesn’t look good. Hopefully, our 15 percent rate that we’ve included in the budget will cover the costs, but their claims rate is much greater than what they anticipated.”

    Vogel said that, depending on how that vote goes, the Town may hold a workshop on March 24 at 6 p.m. at town hall to address the related change in the draft budget. The Town must adopt the budget no later than April 30.

    Millville Volunteer Fire Company Fire Chief Doug Scott spoke to the council at the budget meeting, requesting a grant for $90,000 for the company.

    “It’s always a good feeling to come in amongst friends and in a town so supportive of the fire department,” said Scott, thanking the council for their time.

    Scott said the MVFC has 80 active members, and in 2014 handled 365 fire/rescue calls, as well as 1,721 emergency medical calls, “making us one of the busiest fire departments in the county.”

    Of those, 57 fire/rescues calls and 277 EMS calls were from those inside the town of Ocean View, making up 13.6 percent of the department’s total call volume in 2014.

    Scott said the department annually participates in Town events such as Caroling in the Park and Homecoming, and has a close working relationship with the Ocean View Police Department.

    The $90,000 grant request would help the department purchase several significant operational technology items — 18 portable radios and six laptop computers.

    Scott said the items would replace older models, and are aimed at improving “firefighter safety and the service we provide to the town of Ocean View.”

    Councilman Bob Lawless praised the fire company, saying, “I think the money we provide to Millville Volunteer Fire Company is probably one of the best things we do all year. You guys do a great job, and I think we should all applaud your service.”

    The council will vote at their April 14 meeting as to whether or not to approve the grant request from the Town’s Emergency Services Enhancement Fund.

    In other Town news:

    • The Town received a $10,000 Economic Development & Infrastructure Grant from Sussex County Council. The funds must be used by June 30, 2015. Vogel said possible Town initiatives discussed with and verbally approved by Sussex County Economic Development Director Melody Booker-Wilkins were picnic tables for the park pavilion, a street clock, pathway lighting at the north end of John West Park, and banners for light poles along Route 26.

    The council voted unanimously to give Vogel the leeway to spend the funds by that date, and meet the grant requirements.

    • Police Chief Ken McLaughlin said his department is working on a joint initiative centered on bicycle and pedestrian safety, specifically with all the construction along Route 26. He said an event will be held in late spring or early summer.

    • The council thanked the Town’s Public Works Department and Police Department for their hard work plowing the Town’s roads during the three recent snowstorms.

    • Patrolman Justin Hopkins was recognized at the Valor Awards last month as Ocean View’s Police Officer of the Year.


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    The Indian River School Board’s 2015 election looks like a very off-kilter game of musical chairs. Five candidates are running for one position in District 4 (Frankford, west Dagsboro and points east).

    District 4 incumbent Charles M. Bireley of Dagsboro has challenges from Lloyd Evan Elling of Ocean View, Gregory Michael Goldman of Ocean View, Mary E. Langan of Fenwick Island and Judith “Judy” Ladd Teoli of Millville.

    Meanwhile, Board Member Shaun Fink has no challenger and will, by default, keep his seat for District 2 (north Millsboro).

    In Georgetown, Miguel A. Pirez-Fabar is challenging incumbents James E. Fritz Jr. and James E. Hudson for the two seats in District 1.

    Each term is five years.

    The election for Board of Education will be Tuesday, May 12, at local schools. A qualified voter is must be 18 or older and a resident of the state of Delaware and the school district. Residents may only vote within their IRSD election district.

    View district maps online at electionssc.delaware.gov/school_district_maps.shtml.

    Fink runs unopposed

    Fink has been most prominently mentioned of late for his comments this winter about keeping lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and related terms and information about various sexualities out of the district’s health class curriculum.

    Those comments angered many and were taken as an insult by some. But, despite being challenged on the issue in person and in the media, Fink didn’t garner any competition in the north Millsboro race. He and the other elected candidates will be sworn in this July for five-year term.

    Fink already has ideas for the next term.

    “I am pro-technology,” Fink said. “I want to be the guy that pushed technology. I don’t want to say I have an agenda. … I do believe technology is the next frontier. Although we are ahead on certain areas, we are behind on others.”

    IRSD has incorporated SMART Boards and new phone systems, but after talking with district technicians, Fink said he believes the board should seriously consider technology in future budgets.

    “The future of education, I believe, is going to be much more interactive. On a snow day, why can’t the kids go to school? Because we don’t have the infrastructure,” Fink said. He pointed to online programs used by Delmarva Christian High School, such as Blackboard, that keep all students linked.

    Fink also said he believes the IRSD needs to take a second look at the desires of students post-high school.

    “[We should] identify the kids who don’t want to go to college and not relegate them to insignificance. I firmly believe college is not for everybody. … Those who don’t want or don’t care to go to college — we need to learn to teach them.”

    The IRSD’s college readiness programs “are great,” Fink said, but he said he would like adequate emphasis on students prepping for the workforce, without forcing college on them. Referencing the independent Sussex Technical High School’s increased focus on college preparedness, he said, “Especially since our counterpart school district has decided they don’t want to do that either, somebody’s got to pick up the slack.”

    Fink’s experience

    Fink originally filed for election in 2012, but withdrew because of a possible conflict of interest (his employer specialized in teacher finances).

    In October of 2012, when he was appointed to fill that same seat, he had a new job, and since running unopposed in the regular 2013 election, Fink has started a church and begun teaching.

    Fink teaches a finance course at Delmarva Christian High School — an extension of his own focus on finance at board meetings.

    “In any organization, if you want answers, follow the money,” he said.

    “I feel my life experience has given me the ability to contribute to the goings-on [of] Indian River School District in a positive way,” he said.

    In 2012, the Coastal Point reported that “as a small-business owner, he learned about human resources, budgets and contractors, while several years in the financial world taught him regulations.”

    He has served local nonprofit boards and grown up in rural areas, so he feels he understands the local community.

    Fink wouldn’t say that his personal perspective has changed since joining the school board, but he said he’s learned the school board process.

    “I think it really takes two years to learn how to be an effective board member,” he said. “I feel like now I’ve put some pieces together, and I believe, Lord willing, I’ll be able to be effective. … Anytime you’re dealing with a group of other individuals, there’s a process of give and take.”

    Fink still has children in IRSD elementary, middle and high schools.

    “I get to hand my own daughter her diploma,” he said proudly.

    “The school district is, more than ever, committed to the next century, the future. I think we’re advanced in so many ways,” he said he wants people to know. “I think we’re the best, if not one of the best, districts in the entire state, and we’re very determined to stay there.”

    Constituents are welcome to contact Shaun Fink at shaun.fink@irsd.k12.de.us or (302) 542-7174.


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    Wednesday, March 11, was the deadline for candidates to file to run for the District 4 council seat in Ocean View.

    Four residents, Carol Bodine, Jon Debuchananne, Kent Liddle and Don Walsh filed to run. The election will he held on Saturday, April 11, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at town hall.

    District 4 consists primarily of Wedgefield, Avon Park, Bear Trap and Fairway Village.

    On Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. the Town will hold a Candidates’ Night at town hall, giving the candidates the opportunity to present their platforms to residents and answer any questions. The Town is encouraging all citizens to attend.

    For more information regarding the upcoming election, call (302) 539-9797 or go to the Wallace A. Melson Municipal Building at 201 Central Avenue in Ocean View between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays.


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    Delaware public students are already spending a lot less time in standardized testing. This year, the State shifted to the Delaware System of Student Assessments (DeSSA), meaning that, after years of interrupting classrooms three times annually for state standardized tests, Delaware is returning to a one-time student assessment.

    It’s also pumping up the amount of knowledge students must show. Whereas the formerly used Delaware Comprehensive Assessment System (DCAS) was heavy on multiple-choice questions, the new Smarter Balanced test will measure students’ grasp of the Common Core education standards, which call for more writing and critical thinking.

    “Common Core standards … help tell us what our curriculum should be teaching,” said Jay Owens, Indian River School District director of compliance. “We use assessments to see where our students are.”

    Almost all grades take the math and English language arts state test (grades 3 to 8, and high school juniors), but only a handful are used to evaluate the district on a higher scale.

    While the test is in place for students statewide this year, there are still some unknowns. Several schools piloted the Smarter Balanced test in 2014, but thousands of students and teachers must now learn a new computer program. And new information is coming from the Department of Education regularly.

    “I think [kids] are used to being online. It may look a little differently but, hopefully, they’ll be able to navigate it,” Owens said.

    Although it’s unfamiliar this year, the shorter test window will mean fewer disruptions.

    “I think the teachers really appreciate that, but there is anxiety of new [tests],” Owens said.

    In the past, there were whispers of students intentionally bombing the autumn test so their springtime success would show even greater growth and improvement.

    “Kids are crafty,” Owens acknowledged, but he said that trick wasn’t advocated by IRSD. “Now you’re taking one test. You’ve got do your best. We’re encouraging all our students to do well.”

    Lower scores are expected this year. But that’s not to say that IRSD students and staff are performing at a low level, Owens said. The test is simply more demanding than in years past.

    “We are confident our students and schools will improve and meet the higher expectations,” Owens said.

    About 20 U.S. states are using Smarter Balanced, so the IRSD will be able to see exactly how it compares, on an apples-to-apples nationwide scale.

    Standardized tests change about every five or six years, Owens said.

    New this year is the performance task, where students will learn a new topic and then do a project based on it.

    For instance, the teacher is given materials to present a 30-minute lesson on a particular subject, such as seashells or skyscrapers. Later on, students will have a performance task, such as a persuasive essay, based on that subject.

    The task isn’t meant to test memorization skills regarding butterflies, but instead aims to make students comfortable with the subject before they write about it, “in order to make sure the assessment is equitable to all,” said Will Revels, IRSD supervisor of secondary instruction, “pull that cultural bias out.”

    Not every child grows up surrounded by Atlantic seashells.

    “Kids around here would do pretty well at that, but if I lived in Kansas, I would need to have some idea what a seashell is and some vocabulary about it,” said Mike Lingenfelter, IRSD testing coordinator.

    One performance task may be an essay, in which students have to give an opinion and back up that argument up with good reasoning.

    “It’s more than regurgitating information,” Revels said. “I’m really excited, because it’s real-world applications.”

    DCAS did not have extended writing responses, though older versions of state test did include essays.

    During the performance task, students can use tools including a dictionary, calculator or spell-check.

    “During the performance task, it no longer becomes about readability. It becomes more about how you can answer this. … It’s not a reading test at this point. It’s more research, a higher-level test,” said Lingenfelter.

    “We’re moving to instruction where students are very much involved,” said IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting. “We want them to be thinkers, and this test really pushes them to be thinkers.”

    For now, science and social studies will continue to be tested under DCAS. Testing begins in April for science (grades 5, 8 and 10) and in May for social studies (grades 4 and 7).

    This year’s test is also offered in different languages.

    Individual schools decide when to give the test, which may last four to six days. The testing window begins March 10 for grades 3 to 8, and April 18 for grade 11, running until June.

    Schools can also choose whether to practice with interim assessments, although teachers need training on how to accurately hand-score the new test.

    Because the tests require hand-scoring, students will not get any immediate results, as they did after taking the DCAS (which Lingenfelter said featured more multiple choice and live people scoring the written responses electronically). Families will receive the student reports in July, and statewide scores will be released in August. Students earn a numeric score, from 1 to 4.

    The new DeSSA assessments were designed with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of several groups tasked with creating student assessments for the new Common Core State Standards.

    For more information, visit http://de.portal.airast.org or www.DelExcels.org.


    0 0

    Delaware public students are already spending a lot less time in standardized testing. This year, the State shifted to the Delaware System of Student Assessments (DeSSA), meaning that, after years of interrupting classrooms three times annually for state standardized tests, Delaware is returning to a one-time student assessment.

    It’s also pumping up the amount of knowledge students must show. Whereas the formerly used Delaware Comprehensive Assessment System (DCAS) was heavy on multiple-choice questions, the new Smarter Balanced test will measure students’ grasp of the Common Core education standards, which call for more writing and critical thinking.

    “Common Core standards … help tell us what our curriculum should be teaching,” said Jay Owens, Indian River School District director of compliance. “We use assessments to see where our students are.”

    Almost all grades take the math and English language arts state test (grades 3 to 8, and high school juniors), but only a handful are used to evaluate the district on a higher scale.

    While the test is in place for students statewide this year, there are still some unknowns. Several schools piloted the Smarter Balanced test in 2014, but thousands of students and teachers must now learn a new computer program. And new information is coming from the Department of Education regularly.

    “I think [kids] are used to being online. It may look a little differently but, hopefully, they’ll be able to navigate it,” Owens said.

    Although it’s unfamiliar this year, the shorter test window will mean fewer disruptions.

    “I think the teachers really appreciate that, but there is anxiety of new [tests],” Owens said.

    In the past, there were whispers of students intentionally bombing the autumn test so their springtime success would show even greater growth and improvement.

    “Kids are crafty,” Owens acknowledged, but he said that trick wasn’t advocated by IRSD. “Now you’re taking one test. You’ve got do your best. We’re encouraging all our students to do well.”

    Lower scores are expected this year. But that’s not to say that IRSD students and staff are performing at a low level, Owens said. The test is simply more demanding than in years past.

    “We are confident our students and schools will improve and meet the higher expectations,” Owens said.

    About 20 U.S. states are using Smarter Balanced, so the IRSD will be able to see exactly how it compares, on an apples-to-apples nationwide scale.

    Standardized tests change about every five or six years, Owens said.

    New this year is the performance task, where students will learn a new topic and then do a project based on it.

    For instance, the teacher is given materials to present a 30-minute lesson on a particular subject, such as seashells or skyscrapers. Later on, students will have a performance task, such as a persuasive essay, based on that subject.

    The task isn’t meant to test memorization skills regarding butterflies, but instead aims to make students comfortable with the subject before they write about it, “in order to make sure the assessment is equitable to all,” said Will Revels, IRSD supervisor of secondary instruction, “pull that cultural bias out.”

    Not every child grows up surrounded by Atlantic seashells.

    “Kids around here would do pretty well at that, but if I lived in Kansas, I would need to have some idea what a seashell is and some vocabulary about it,” said Mike Lingenfelter, IRSD testing coordinator.

    One performance task may be an essay, in which students have to give an opinion and back up that argument up with good reasoning.

    “It’s more than regurgitating information,” Revels said. “I’m really excited, because it’s real-world applications.”

    DCAS did not have extended writing responses, though older versions of state test did include essays.

    During the performance task, students can use tools including a dictionary, calculator or spell-check.

    “During the performance task, it no longer becomes about readability. It becomes more about how you can answer this. … It’s not a reading test at this point. It’s more research, a higher-level test,” said Lingenfelter.

    “We’re moving to instruction where students are very much involved,” said IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting. “We want them to be thinkers, and this test really pushes them to be thinkers.”

    For now, science and social studies will continue to be tested under DCAS. Testing begins in April for science (grades 5, 8 and 10) and in May for social studies (grades 4 and 7).

    This year’s test is also offered in different languages.

    Individual schools decide when to give the test, which may last four to six days. The testing window begins March 10 for grades 3 to 8, and April 18 for grade 11, running until June.

    Schools can also choose whether to practice with interim assessments, although teachers need training on how to accurately hand-score the new test.

    Because the tests require hand-scoring, students will not get any immediate results, as they did after taking the DCAS (which Lingenfelter said featured more multiple choice and live people scoring the written responses electronically). Families will receive the student reports in July, and statewide scores will be released in August. Students earn a numeric score, from 1 to 4.

    The new DeSSA assessments were designed with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of several groups tasked with creating student assessments for the new Common Core State Standards.

    For more information, visit http://de.portal.airast.org or www.DelExcels.org.


    0 0

    Delaware public students are already spending a lot less time in standardized testing. This year, the State shifted to the Delaware System of Student Assessments (DeSSA), meaning that, after years of interrupting classrooms three times annually for state standardized tests, Delaware is returning to a one-time student assessment.

    It’s also pumping up the amount of knowledge students must show. Whereas the formerly used Delaware Comprehensive Assessment System (DCAS) was heavy on multiple-choice questions, the new Smarter Balanced test will measure students’ grasp of the Common Core education standards, which call for more writing and critical thinking.

    “Common Core standards … help tell us what our curriculum should be teaching,” said Jay Owens, Indian River School District director of compliance. “We use assessments to see where our students are.”

    Almost all grades take the math and English language arts state test (grades 3 to 8, and high school juniors), but only a handful are used to evaluate the district on a higher scale.

    While the test is in place for students statewide this year, there are still some unknowns. Several schools piloted the Smarter Balanced test in 2014, but thousands of students and teachers must now learn a new computer program. And new information is coming from the Department of Education regularly.

    “I think [kids] are used to being online. It may look a little differently but, hopefully, they’ll be able to navigate it,” Owens said.

    Although it’s unfamiliar this year, the shorter test window will mean fewer disruptions.

    “I think the teachers really appreciate that, but there is anxiety of new [tests],” Owens said.

    In the past, there were whispers of students intentionally bombing the autumn test so their springtime success would show even greater growth and improvement.

    “Kids are crafty,” Owens acknowledged, but he said that trick wasn’t advocated by IRSD. “Now you’re taking one test. You’ve got do your best. We’re encouraging all our students to do well.”

    Lower scores are expected this year. But that’s not to say that IRSD students and staff are performing at a low level, Owens said. The test is simply more demanding than in years past.

    “We are confident our students and schools will improve and meet the higher expectations,” Owens said.

    About 20 U.S. states are using Smarter Balanced, so the IRSD will be able to see exactly how it compares, on an apples-to-apples nationwide scale.

    Standardized tests change about every five or six years, Owens said.

    New this year is the performance task, where students will learn a new topic and then do a project based on it.

    For instance, the teacher is given materials to present a 30-minute lesson on a particular subject, such as seashells or skyscrapers. Later on, students will have a performance task, such as a persuasive essay, based on that subject.

    The task isn’t meant to test memorization skills regarding butterflies, but instead aims to make students comfortable with the subject before they write about it, “in order to make sure the assessment is equitable to all,” said Will Revels, IRSD supervisor of secondary instruction, “pull that cultural bias out.”

    Not every child grows up surrounded by Atlantic seashells.

    “Kids around here would do pretty well at that, but if I lived in Kansas, I would need to have some idea what a seashell is and some vocabulary about it,” said Mike Lingenfelter, IRSD testing coordinator.

    One performance task may be an essay, in which students have to give an opinion and back up that argument up with good reasoning.

    “It’s more than regurgitating information,” Revels said. “I’m really excited, because it’s real-world applications.”

    DCAS did not have extended writing responses, though older versions of state test did include essays.

    During the performance task, students can use tools including a dictionary, calculator or spell-check.

    “During the performance task, it no longer becomes about readability. It becomes more about how you can answer this. … It’s not a reading test at this point. It’s more research, a higher-level test,” said Lingenfelter.

    “We’re moving to instruction where students are very much involved,” said IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting. “We want them to be thinkers, and this test really pushes them to be thinkers.”

    For now, science and social studies will continue to be tested under DCAS. Testing begins in April for science (grades 5, 8 and 10) and in May for social studies (grades 4 and 7).

    This year’s test is also offered in different languages.

    Individual schools decide when to give the test, which may last four to six days. The testing window begins March 10 for grades 3 to 8, and April 18 for grade 11, running until June.

    Schools can also choose whether to practice with interim assessments, although teachers need training on how to accurately hand-score the new test.

    Because the tests require hand-scoring, students will not get any immediate results, as they did after taking the DCAS (which Lingenfelter said featured more multiple choice and live people scoring the written responses electronically). Families will receive the student reports in July, and statewide scores will be released in August. Students earn a numeric score, from 1 to 4.

    The new DeSSA assessments were designed with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of several groups tasked with creating student assessments for the new Common Core State Standards.

    For more information, visit http://de.portal.airast.org or www.DelExcels.org.


    0 0

    Delaware public students are already spending a lot less time in standardized testing. This year, the State shifted to the Delaware System of Student Assessments (DeSSA), meaning that, after years of interrupting classrooms three times annually for state standardized tests, Delaware is returning to a one-time student assessment.

    It’s also pumping up the amount of knowledge students must show. Whereas the formerly used Delaware Comprehensive Assessment System (DCAS) was heavy on multiple-choice questions, the new Smarter Balanced test will measure students’ grasp of the Common Core education standards, which call for more writing and critical thinking.

    “Common Core standards … help tell us what our curriculum should be teaching,” said Jay Owens, Indian River School District director of compliance. “We use assessments to see where our students are.”

    Almost all grades take the math and English language arts state test (grades 3 to 8, and high school juniors), but only a handful are used to evaluate the district on a higher scale.

    While the test is in place for students statewide this year, there are still some unknowns. Several schools piloted the Smarter Balanced test in 2014, but thousands of students and teachers must now learn a new computer program. And new information is coming from the Department of Education regularly.

    “I think [kids] are used to being online. It may look a little differently but, hopefully, they’ll be able to navigate it,” Owens said.

    Although it’s unfamiliar this year, the shorter test window will mean fewer disruptions.

    “I think the teachers really appreciate that, but there is anxiety of new [tests],” Owens said.

    In the past, there were whispers of students intentionally bombing the autumn test so their springtime success would show even greater growth and improvement.

    “Kids are crafty,” Owens acknowledged, but he said that trick wasn’t advocated by IRSD. “Now you’re taking one test. You’ve got do your best. We’re encouraging all our students to do well.”

    Lower scores are expected this year. But that’s not to say that IRSD students and staff are performing at a low level, Owens said. The test is simply more demanding than in years past.

    “We are confident our students and schools will improve and meet the higher expectations,” Owens said.

    About 20 U.S. states are using Smarter Balanced, so the IRSD will be able to see exactly how it compares, on an apples-to-apples nationwide scale.

    Standardized tests change about every five or six years, Owens said.

    New this year is the performance task, where students will learn a new topic and then do a project based on it.

    For instance, the teacher is given materials to present a 30-minute lesson on a particular subject, such as seashells or skyscrapers. Later on, students will have a performance task, such as a persuasive essay, based on that subject.

    The task isn’t meant to test memorization skills regarding butterflies, but instead aims to make students comfortable with the subject before they write about it, “in order to make sure the assessment is equitable to all,” said Will Revels, IRSD supervisor of secondary instruction, “pull that cultural bias out.”

    Not every child grows up surrounded by Atlantic seashells.

    “Kids around here would do pretty well at that, but if I lived in Kansas, I would need to have some idea what a seashell is and some vocabulary about it,” said Mike Lingenfelter, IRSD testing coordinator.

    One performance task may be an essay, in which students have to give an opinion and back up that argument up with good reasoning.

    “It’s more than regurgitating information,” Revels said. “I’m really excited, because it’s real-world applications.”

    DCAS did not have extended writing responses, though older versions of state test did include essays.

    During the performance task, students can use tools including a dictionary, calculator or spell-check.

    “During the performance task, it no longer becomes about readability. It becomes more about how you can answer this. … It’s not a reading test at this point. It’s more research, a higher-level test,” said Lingenfelter.

    “We’re moving to instruction where students are very much involved,” said IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting. “We want them to be thinkers, and this test really pushes them to be thinkers.”

    For now, science and social studies will continue to be tested under DCAS. Testing begins in April for science (grades 5, 8 and 10) and in May for social studies (grades 4 and 7).

    This year’s test is also offered in different languages.

    Individual schools decide when to give the test, which may last four to six days. The testing window begins March 10 for grades 3 to 8, and April 18 for grade 11, running until June.

    Schools can also choose whether to practice with interim assessments, although teachers need training on how to accurately hand-score the new test.

    Because the tests require hand-scoring, students will not get any immediate results, as they did after taking the DCAS (which Lingenfelter said featured more multiple choice and live people scoring the written responses electronically). Families will receive the student reports in July, and statewide scores will be released in August. Students earn a numeric score, from 1 to 4.

    The new DeSSA assessments were designed with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of several groups tasked with creating student assessments for the new Common Core State Standards.

    For more information, visit http://de.portal.airast.org or www.DelExcels.org.


    0 0

    Delaware public students are already spending a lot less time in standardized testing. This year, the State shifted to the Delaware System of Student Assessments (DeSSA), meaning that, after years of interrupting classrooms three times annually for state standardized tests, Delaware is returning to a one-time student assessment.

    It’s also pumping up the amount of knowledge students must show. Whereas the formerly used Delaware Comprehensive Assessment System (DCAS) was heavy on multiple-choice questions, the new Smarter Balanced test will measure students’ grasp of the Common Core education standards, which call for more writing and critical thinking.

    “Common Core standards … help tell us what our curriculum should be teaching,” said Jay Owens, Indian River School District director of compliance. “We use assessments to see where our students are.”

    Almost all grades take the math and English language arts state test (grades 3 to 8, and high school juniors), but only a handful are used to evaluate the district on a higher scale.

    While the test is in place for students statewide this year, there are still some unknowns. Several schools piloted the Smarter Balanced test in 2014, but thousands of students and teachers must now learn a new computer program. And new information is coming from the Department of Education regularly.

    “I think [kids] are used to being online. It may look a little differently but, hopefully, they’ll be able to navigate it,” Owens said.

    Although it’s unfamiliar this year, the shorter test window will mean fewer disruptions.

    “I think the teachers really appreciate that, but there is anxiety of new [tests],” Owens said.

    In the past, there were whispers of students intentionally bombing the autumn test so their springtime success would show even greater growth and improvement.

    “Kids are crafty,” Owens acknowledged, but he said that trick wasn’t advocated by IRSD. “Now you’re taking one test. You’ve got do your best. We’re encouraging all our students to do well.”

    Lower scores are expected this year. But that’s not to say that IRSD students and staff are performing at a low level, Owens said. The test is simply more demanding than in years past.

    “We are confident our students and schools will improve and meet the higher expectations,” Owens said.

    About 20 U.S. states are using Smarter Balanced, so the IRSD will be able to see exactly how it compares, on an apples-to-apples nationwide scale.

    Standardized tests change about every five or six years, Owens said.

    New this year is the performance task, where students will learn a new topic and then do a project based on it.

    For instance, the teacher is given materials to present a 30-minute lesson on a particular subject, such as seashells or skyscrapers. Later on, students will have a performance task, such as a persuasive essay, based on that subject.

    The task isn’t meant to test memorization skills regarding butterflies, but instead aims to make students comfortable with the subject before they write about it, “in order to make sure the assessment is equitable to all,” said Will Revels, IRSD supervisor of secondary instruction, “pull that cultural bias out.”

    Not every child grows up surrounded by Atlantic seashells.

    “Kids around here would do pretty well at that, but if I lived in Kansas, I would need to have some idea what a seashell is and some vocabulary about it,” said Mike Lingenfelter, IRSD testing coordinator.

    One performance task may be an essay, in which students have to give an opinion and back up that argument up with good reasoning.

    “It’s more than regurgitating information,” Revels said. “I’m really excited, because it’s real-world applications.”

    DCAS did not have extended writing responses, though older versions of state test did include essays.

    During the performance task, students can use tools including a dictionary, calculator or spell-check.

    “During the performance task, it no longer becomes about readability. It becomes more about how you can answer this. … It’s not a reading test at this point. It’s more research, a higher-level test,” said Lingenfelter.

    “We’re moving to instruction where students are very much involved,” said IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting. “We want them to be thinkers, and this test really pushes them to be thinkers.”

    For now, science and social studies will continue to be tested under DCAS. Testing begins in April for science (grades 5, 8 and 10) and in May for social studies (grades 4 and 7).

    This year’s test is also offered in different languages.

    Individual schools decide when to give the test, which may last four to six days. The testing window begins March 10 for grades 3 to 8, and April 18 for grade 11, running until June.

    Schools can also choose whether to practice with interim assessments, although teachers need training on how to accurately hand-score the new test.

    Because the tests require hand-scoring, students will not get any immediate results, as they did after taking the DCAS (which Lingenfelter said featured more multiple choice and live people scoring the written responses electronically). Families will receive the student reports in July, and statewide scores will be released in August. Students earn a numeric score, from 1 to 4.

    The new DeSSA assessments were designed with the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, one of several groups tasked with creating student assessments for the new Common Core State Standards.

    For more information, visit http://de.portal.airast.org or www.DelExcels.org.


    0 0

    Eric Bodenweiser, 56, of Georgetown, a former candidate for the Delaware state senate, pled no contest to two counts of third-degree unlawful sexual contact in Sussex County Superior Court Wednesday morning. The plea, secured by Deputy Attorneys General David Hume and John Donahue, resolves a case that resulted in a hung jury in June 2014.

    As a result of the plea, Bodenweiser is now classified as a sex offender. Sentencing is currently scheduled to take place May 22.

    The victim in the case said, “I’m glad that this has finally come to an end and I can finally move forward and get on with my life.”

    More in the March 20 issue of the Coastal Point.


    0 0

    Paddle Second Chance recently announced that it will hold its third annual Stand-Up Paddle (SUP) board day of racing and fundraising for Operation Second Chance (OSC). OSC is a non-profit 501(c) organization committed to serving wounded combat veterans and their families’ recovery and transition back to active duty or into civilian life.

    This year’s event will kick off on Friday, June 26, with paddler registration, packet pickup and a happy hour at The Starboard in Dewey Beach. Race day will be Saturday, June 27, at Holts Landing State Park near Millville, featuring the main event — a 5- and 2.5-mile race — followed by a co-ed SUP relay and SUP kids’ race. The event will wrap up with an awards ceremony and community picnic for all those in attendance.

    Last year, Paddle Second Chance received national recognition as the SUPtheMag Philanthropic Event of the 2014.

    “This year’s event will be even bigger, thanks to the support of our local SUP community and newfound national exposure. We are also excited about adding a coed SUP team relay for some friendly competition and bragging rights amongst local business sponsors,” said Walt Ellenberger, PSC chairperson.

    Returning national headline sponsors are Boardworks and B2and Company. Early local sponsors include Delmarva Board Sports, Walk On Water Paddleboard Company, KSJ Corporation and LandShark/NKS Distributors. Organizers said they welcome sponsorship from local residents and businesses “for a cause that truly impacts wounded heroes’ lives.”

    Paddle Second Chance 2015 is officially open for “early paddler” registration. For more information on being a paddler, sponsor or volunteer, visit www.paddlesecondchance.com.


    0 0

    The 26th Annual Ocean to Bay Bike Tour, presented by PNC Bank, will take place on April 18 beginning at 7:30 a.m. in downtown Bethany Beach. Hosted by the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce, cyclists region-wide will complete 5-, 30- or 50-mile or metric century courses travelling throughout Southern Delaware’s beach and bay locales.

    Coastal Point File Photo: Participants in the Ocean to the Bay Bike Tour cruise along the course  at their own pace.Coastal Point File Photo
    Participants in the Ocean to the Bay Bike Tour cruise along the course at their own pace.
    Registrants will receive access to exclusive gifts and amenities, including a long-sleeved tech T-shirt, swag bag and rest stops along each of the routes, with restrooms, food and beverages. “Sag wagon” support will be available from 7:30 a.m. through 2:30 p.m.

    Ocean to Bay Voler jerseys are also available for purchase with to-your-door delivery. New this year, participants and the community can celebrate the ride and welcome visitors by tagging #OceanToBay on social media.

    The ceremonial start will be held at 7:30 a.m. in downtown Bethany Beach for the show-and-go tour. After the main event, participants will be invited to the Continue the Tour Post-Party Tent, with live entertainment featuring Monkey Paw Duo, as well as food, beverages, vendors and prizes.

    All registrants will be entered to win special prize packages, awarded through a drawing of bib numbers. Further vouchers and specials will be available at many participating local businesses throughout the Quiet Resorts. For those looking to stay overnight, participants who mention the Ocean to Bay Bike Tour will receive a 10 percent discount on their ResortQuest/Wyndham Vacation Rentals reservation when staying two nights or more.

    “With the expansion of the rest stop, Post-Party Tent and an unprecedented number of cyclists registered at this point, the Ocean to Bay Bike Tour is shaping up to be a fantastic event,” said Chamber Executive Director Kristie Maravalli. “The Chamber has increased its social media presence including a re-launch of Instagram, so we are going to have lot of fun with our cyclists and business community with the hashtag #OceantoBay.”

    Registration is open, and current prices will increase on April 1. Individual, Team and Family Fun groups may be registered, with children younger than 5 riding for free. Registration can be completed by mail, email or in person at the Chamber; online registration is available through April 15. Visit www.thequietresorts.org to register, receive more information on packet pickup, deals and vendors.

    For more information or to register, visit the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce website at www.thequietresorts.com, or call 1-800-962-7873 toll-free or (302) 539-2100 for local residents.


    0 0

    On Sunday, March 22, the Rehoboth Beach Writers’ Guild will host nationally acclaimed writer Robert Bausch, who will be reading from his latest novel, “As Far as the Eye Can See,” and talking with his audience about writing, the writing life and publishing. The event, to be held at Dogfish Brewings & Eats in Rehoboth, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., is free and open to the public.

    Bausch, a favorite at the Writers at the Beach conferences held in Rehoboth from 2005 to 2010, has been lauded for his work in Newsweek, which called the first novel “compelling,” as well as the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post (which chose his fifth novel, “Out of Season,” as their favorite book of the year for 2005), and the New York Times.

    The rights to his novel “Almighty Me” were sold to Hollywood Films, a division of Disney Studios and was later released in film version, uncredited, as “Bruce Almighty.”

    Bausch’s latest novel, “As Far as the Eye Can See,” just released from Bloomsbury Press, has been praised by the New York Times as “An entertaining old-school Western [in] the reluctant-hero tradition of Charles Portis (‘True Grit’).”

    Kirkus reviews said, “With a setting gleaming with historical accuracy and a protagonist whose voice is right out of Twain, Bausch’s novel is a worthy addition to America’s Western literary canon, there to share shelf space with ‘The Big Sky,’ ‘Little Big Man’ and ‘Lonesome Dove.’”

    Since 1975, Bausch has been teaching and inspiring writers, as a college professor at the University of Virginia, American University, George Mason University, Johns Hopkins University — and for the balance of his career at Northern Virginia Community College. He’s published with mainstream presses, as well as with Amazon’s CreateSpace, and has plenty to say about the writing life, agents, publishing — and what it is that keeps writers writing.

    For more information about Bausch, the event, or to RSVP (not necessary, but helpful, organizers said), email contactus@rehobothbeachwritersguild.com. Dogfish will be serving food and drink throughout the conversation and reading.


    0 0

    The Clear Space Theatre Company of Rehoboth Beach announced this week that author Mindi Dickstein, lyricist of “Little Women: The Musical,” will be guest speaker at a workshop on Sunday March 22, at 6:30 pm at the theater. A $5 donation is requested to attend the workshop.

    In her workshop for adults, Dickstein will use an actor from Clear Space’s production of “Little Women: The Musical” to demonstrate how a lyricist might expect you to “play a lyric.” She will then invite guests to sing for her and will help them understand how the lyricist of the song might have expected the song to be acted or interpreted based on the lyrics written, and even why they wrote this lyric for that moment. Anyone interested in musical theater may wish to attend the workshop.

    “Mindi is our second guest appearance by an artist associated with creation of one of our productions. She wrote the lyrics for ‘Little Women: The Musical,’ which will be present by Clear Space May 1-17, 2015,” said Wesley Paulson, executive director.

    “In 2014, we were fortunate to host Del Shores, the writer of ‘Sordid Lives,’ which we presented on stage last summer. Hosting creative talents like Ms. Dickstein and Mr. Shores allows members of the community to learn about the creative process behind the shows we present.”

    Recent projects by Dickstein include: book and lyrics for “Trip,” an original musical inspired by the tales of Washington Irving, commissioned by Playwrights Horizons; and book for “Toy Story — The Musical,” commissioned by Disney Creative Entertainment.

    Other produced work includes: several musicals for Theatreworks USA, including “Nate the Great & the Mystery of King Tut;” book and lyrics for “Beasts & Saints,” a musical comedy (Boston Music Theater Project, ASCAP Workshop, MTW’s Fresh Voices), a one-act contributed to an evening of short musicals under the umbrella title “Notes Across a Small Pond” (the Bridewell Theater, London), “The Falling Man,” an opera in 13 minutes (Cucaracha Theater), and “The Magic Cookie,” a 10-minute musical (New York Theater Workshop). Plays include “The Existential Gourmet,” a tragicomedy (The Women’s Project) and”Guadeloupe,” a farce (Westbeth Theater Center).

    Dickstein’s songs have been performed widely, most notably as part of Lincoln Center’s American Songbook (“Hear & Now: Contemporary Lyricists”) and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

    Her awards and honors include: Jonathan Larson Foundation Award, Massachusetts Artists Foundation Playwriting Fellowship, two Playwriting Fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, ASCAP Bernice Cohen Award, Second Stage Constance Klinsky Award for Excellence in Musical Theater, and a PEN International New Playwright Award (selected by Wendy Wasserstein).

    Dickstein received her master’s degree from New York University’s Graduate Musical Theatre Writing Program, where she was an Oscar Hammerstein Fellow and where she now serves on the faculty.

    She is appearing as part of 10-week series of adult acting workshops sponsored by Clear Space Theatre. Other workshops have featured stage combat, audition techniques and readings from a new playwright. Clear Space Theatre is located at 20 Baltimore Avenue in downtown Rehoboth Beach. For further information, visit www.clearspacetheatre.org or call (302) 227-2270.


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    Volunteer training to be offered April 11 and 16

    The Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve (DNERR) is seeking volunteers to assist with DNREC’s annual bay-wide horseshoe crab spawning survey in May and June on the Ted Harvey Wildlife Area, Kitts Hummock and North Bowers beaches.

    For those who are interested in assisting with this year’s survey, DNERR staff will host two volunteer training sessions at the St. Jones Reserve, 818 Kitts Hummock Road, Dover. New volunteers are required to attend the training and past participants are strongly encouraged to attend one of the two sessions: 10 to 11:30 a.m., Saturday, April 11; and 6 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 16.

    Volunteers should preregister online before the training dates by visiting http://de.gov/dnerrhscsurvey. Volunteers must be 13 or older to participate in the survey, and any volunteers between the ages of 13 and 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration also is required to assist in the survey.

    In the training sessions, volunteers will learn how to conduct the survey, properly record data and distinguish between male and female horseshoe crabs. The training will also highlight results of horseshoe crab survey data and how it is being used.

    Training participants will also be instructed on how to provide preferred dates for survey nights. Surveys are conducted at high tide in the evening between 8 p.m. and midnight during peak spawning in May and June. The total time commitment per night will range from two to three hours, depending on how many horseshoe crabs there are to count.

    Since 1990, horseshoe crab spawning surveys have been conducted by volunteers counting crabs on Delaware Bay beaches in Delaware and in New Jersey. Despite the horseshoe crab’s importance to the ecology of the bay, little is known about its population status, organizers said.

    “The data collected by volunteers during these surveys is key for scientists to monitor changes in numbers of spawning crabs in the Delaware Bay,” said DNERR Education Coordinator Maggie Pletta. “And Delaware’s well-trained and enthusiastic volunteers have made this program one of the most successful volunteer-based wildlife surveys in the country.”

    For more information on horseshoe crab monitoring, contact Maggie Pletta at (302) 739-6377 or email Margaret.Pletta@state.de.us. For more information on horseshoe crab monitoring and other DNERR programs, visit http://de.gov/dnerr.

    The Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve is a partnership between the Delaware Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration. DNERR is administered through the Delaware Coastal Programs Section of DNREC’s Office of the Secretary.

    The project is part of DNREC’s Bayshore Initiative, a landscape approach to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat, increase volunteer participation in habitat stewardship projects, enhance low-impact outdoor recreation and ecotourism opportunities, and promote associated environmentally compatible economic development. For more information, go to www.dnrec.delaware.gov/Pages/Delaware-Bayshore.aspx.

    2015 horseshoe crab spawning
    survey dates and times of high tide

    Survey date Time of high tide*

    Friday, May 1 8:03 p.m.

    Sunday, May 3 9:18 p.m.

    Tuesday, May 5 10:35 p.m.

    Saturday, May 16 8:14 p.m.

    Monday, May 18 9:50 p.m.

    Wednesday, May 20 11:22 p.m.

    Sunday, May 31 8:08 p.m.

    Tuesday, June 2 9:31 p.m.

    Thursday, June 4 10:59 p.m.

    Sunday, June 14 7:57 p.m.

    Tuesday, June 17 9:32 p.m.

    Thursday, June 18 10:59 p.m.

    *Note that times listed above are the high tides for the DNERR-coordinated beaches only. Participants who are interested in other Delaware Bay beaches not coordinated by DNERR are welcome to attend the training and will be referred to the appropriate beach leader for further information.


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    Kids of all ages are being invited to bring family and friends to a night of conducting experiments and participating in activities while exploring the world of science and engineering. They can learn how things work and explore with labs and hands-on activities. The event is free, open to the public and will be held Friday, March 27, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Jefferson School, 22051 Wilson Rd, Georgetown.

    Attendees will be able to learn about space suits with ILC Dover, geology with Steven Smailer, bridge building with DelDOT and environmental science with Salisbury University, Delaware Technical Community College and the Center for Inland Bays. The Coast Guard Museum will also be there with demonstrations and will have artifacts on hand. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call (302) 856-3300.

    The Jefferson School, a non-sectarian, independent day school, is located on 43 wooded acres in Georgetown and strives to provide innovative, academic programs that foster an enthusiasm for learning. To learn about enrollment openings and more about the school, contact Connie Hendricks, head of school, at (302) 856-3300 or visit www.jeffersonschool.com.


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