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    It’s a common summer dilemma. A home has been rented for the summer and there is no mailbox installed at the property to receive mail. Or, a seasonal worker living in shared housing is worried about the security of their mail. According to Ocean View Postmaster
    Mike Behringer, there is a solution: rent a post office box at the Ocean View post office.

    Behringer said post office boxes offer security for mail under lock and key, as well as being protected by federal statute.

    “Our lobby area is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so our P.O. box customers can pick up their mail whenever it is convenient for them,” said Behringer. “Plus, we also have parcel lockers so customers can pick up packages 24 hours a day.”

    Post office boxes now offer customers the ability to utilize street addressing for the box. “If it has been difficult for you to receive an online shipping order because the shipping company won’t send to P.O. boxes, that is now a thing of the past,” said Behringer. “In addition, there is now easy pickup for items that require a signature through our Signature on File service for receipt of Express Mail, Signature Confirmation & Insured Mail over $200.”

    Boxes come in three different sizes, ranging from 3 by 5.5 inches to 5.5 by 11 inches. Prices range from $30 to $70 for a six-month period, depending on the size of the box.

    The Ocean View post office is located at 35764 Atlantic Avenue (next to Halpern Eye) and can be reached at (302) 539-9466.


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    Barbara W. Vaughan of Lewes recently announced her candidacy for the 20th Representative District seat in the Delaware House.

    According to Vaughan’s campaign, for 24 years, Vaughan has served in community, cultural, political and social organizations and activities, aiming to benefit of the citizens of the City of Lewes, the entire District 20 region and Sussex County.

    “Now as RD20’s Democratic candidate for Delaware’s House of Representatives, she offers her extensive knowledge, experience and dedication to improve the quality of life and economy of the district,” they said.

    Vaughan’s campaign representatives said the five key issues she will focus on when elected are:

    (1) Improving transportation and related infrastructure within RD20 and Eastern Sussex County, with a goal to reduce congestion, facilitate access to jobs and improve pedestrian safety. “Vaughan’s community service experience demonstrates that she is able to facilitate increased cooperation between the County and State on this issue.”

    (2) Supporting efforts to increase job opportunities in Sussex County, to develop and expand new business sectors and training and nurture the tourism industry that brings billions of dollars into Delaware.

    (3) Placing greater attention on drug rehabilitation instead of incarceration and providing support for newly released citizens to reduce recidivism, to treat addiction and decrease the State’s fiscal burden caused by lengthy jail sentences for non-violent offenders. Vaughan said she will continue to work to seek equal justice in the criminal justice system.

    (4) Enabling elders to remain in their homes as long as possible. The goal is to improve the lives of senior citizens, create jobs and reduce overall healthcare costs for individuals and Delaware. As a founder of the Greater Lewes Community Village program, Vaughan is experienced in providing solutions as the population in RD20 ages.

    (5) Advocating for regional planning and sound land-use policies, to avoid overdevelopment, worse traffic congestion and substantial loss of the natural environment. “Vaughan has been an effective proponent of smart growth for years, working cooperatively to meet the challenges of a growing population.”

    Vaughan is a native of Wilkinsburg, Pa., and completed a degree in history and political science from Allegheny College. She began her career in the U.S. State Department, in the Educational Exchange Service. She also worked for the Key School in Annapolis, Md., and retired from Anne Arundel Community College in Arundel, Md., as director of human resources. During this time, her family grew to include three children. Now, her family has grown to include six grandchildren.

    Upon moving to Lewes, Vaughan worked to establish an after-school program for children in the Burton subdivision and initiated the effort to create a Historic Preservation Commission in Lewes. She was elected to the Lewes City Council in 2004 and served on it for eight years. While on the Council, she championed the Historic Preservation Commission, the revitalization of Second Street, the development of the Canalfront Park and “smart, planned growth emphasizing the infrastructure required for the City to grow.”

    Vaughan was appointed to the Lewes Planning Commission after stepping down from the City Council. She is active in the Lewes Historical Society, the Lewes Scenic and Historic Byways Committee, as a commissioner of the Lewes Public Library and as a founder of the Greater Lewes Community Village.

    In addition, Vaughan serves on the steering committee of the newly active Southern Delaware Alliance for Racial Justice and is secretary of the 20th Representative District Democratic Committee. In 2015, she received the Citizen of the Year award from the Greater Lewes Foundation.

    “As your representative, I plan to be an informed and proactive participant in addressing the various legislative issues of concern to those living in Representative District 20,” she said. “Given the nature of the issues facing us, I strongly believe that a bipartisan approach is necessary to finding practical, workable solutions. Over the years I have developed positive relationships with the County and State officials on both sides of the aisle.”

    For further information, contact Kerry Thalheim, campaign manager, by email at barbaravaughanrd20@gmail.com.


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    Administrators and teachers in the Indian River School District will receive child sexual abuse prevention training this summer through a special program sponsored by the Beau Biden Foundation for the Protection of Children.

    Stewards of Children, the flagship program of the nonprofit organization Darkness to Light, teaches adults to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to child sexual abuse. The evidence-based program is designed to offer practical prevention training with a conversational, real-world approach. The training was to be provided to about 60 IRSD administrators on Thursday, July 7, and to new teachers on Wednesday, Aug. 24.

    The two-hour, facilitator-led training sessions will feature DVD commentary from child sexual abuse survivors and experts in the field of child abuse. There will also be facilitator-led discussions of issues involving prevention. Training will also focus on the program’s “5 Steps of Protecting Our Children”: (1) Learn the facts, (2) Minimize opportunity, (3) Talk about it, (4) Recognize the signs, and (5) React responsibly.

    “This is an excellent opportunity to provide valuable child abuse prevention training to our employees,” IRSD Superintendent Susan Bunting said. “Research shows that 1 in 10 children in the United States will be sexually abused before the age of 18. It is our responsibility as a public school district to do everything possible to reverse this trend. We are grateful to the Beau Biden Foundation for bringing this outstanding training program to our district.”

    In 2010, while prosecuting a notorious child sexual abuse case, then-Attorney General Beau Biden made a commitment to training 35,000 Delaware adults, or 5 percent of the state’s population, in child abuse prevention. The Department of Justice eventually partnered with organizations such as the YMCA of Delaware and Prevent Child Abuse Delaware to bring Stewards of Children to the state.

    “We have seen the progress that can be made when society commits to shining a bright light on a crime like domestic violence, and we are seeing the beginning of what can be accomplished if we continue shining that bright light on child abuse,” Biden said prior to his death in May of 2015. “As adults, we have a legal and moral obligation to stand up and speak out for children who are being abused. These children cannot speak for themselves.”

    “Our goal is prevention. We want an absolute, full-on focus on prevention,” said Patricia Dailey Lewis, executive director of the Beau Biden Foundation. “This is not a problem than can be solved simply by locking up the perpetrators of child sexual abuse.”

    Lewis explained that the 5 percent figure represents a “tipping point” that often leads to a cultural shift in attitude regarding social issues. She noted Stewards of Children was attractive in that it was evidence-based and focused on the survivors of child sexual abuse, rather than the perpetrators.

    Stewards of Children allows participants to hear the stories of those who survived child sexual abuse, experienced its immediate and long-term effects, and ultimately were able to heal. They’ll also hear testimony from experts who work with children and families and confront abuse on a daily basis.

    Stewards of Children training for new teachers will be held during the district’s annual New Teacher Week in August.


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    The Blackwater Village Association recently announced its first annual Car Show, to be held on Saturday, July 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the grounds of the Blackwater Village common area, at 31275 Mohican Drive, Dagsboro, off Route 26, with trophies, food, vendors and door prizes. The rain date is Saturday, July 23.

    All types of vehicles are welcome to participate, with trophies to be given out in six categories: Classic (any vehicle between 20 and 45 years old) Antique (any vehicle older than 45 years old) Modern (any vehicle newer than 20 years old) Custom (any vehicle modified from the original stock) Pride & Joy (any type of vehicle that is dear to the owner’s heart) and a special People’s Choice trophy (the vehicle with the most votes from the people, which can be any vehicle in any category).

    Registration starts at 9 a.m. on July 16, with trophies being awarded at 2 p.m. Pre-registration is until July 9, at $15 per vehicle, or people can sign up the day of the show for $20 per vehicle. Vendor space is also available on a first-come, first-served basis, for $25. Space is limited for vehicles and vendors, so to pre-register or for more information, contact Chairperson Mike Gonder at (302) 539-3219 or (302) 245-7784 or email: mgsafer@mchsi.com.

    The registration form can also be downloaded on the Blackwater Village Facebook page at Facebook.com/Blackwater Village Association.


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    Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Just one of the boats that participated in the South Bethany Boat Parade on Sunday, July 3.Coastal Point photos • Tyler Valliant: Just one of the boats that participated in the South Bethany Boat Parade on Sunday, July 3.South Bethany officials this week offered their thanks to the owners of the 17 boats that registered for the third annual South Bethany Boat Parade, as well as the additional boats and kayaks who joined in.

    At 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 3, the canals were lined with residents and visitors prepared to watch the boats making their way along the waterways of South Bethany. Kent and Bobbe Stephan’s boat from S. Anchorage Avenue led the parade with their “Sharknado” theme. Aboard were their son, Jonathan Stephan and his wife, Sam, and Hugh and Ginny Meade.

    The “Safety Boat,” captained by Joe Conway of Henlopen Drive, was positioned in the center of the parade. Aboard with Joe and Terry Conway were Mayor Pat Voveris, Police Chief Troy Crowson and Bethany Beach Fire Department representative Dan Cowell.

    The Town thanked the parade judges for their unbiased voting. Stationed at the end of Rebecca Road, judges Dave Wilson, Martha Lowe and Anne Long had a bird’s-eye view of the boats coming and going.

    “Best in Show” went to the boat captained by Joe Petito of S. Anchorage. The theme was “Cleopatra on the Nile,” featuring his wife as Cleopatra.

    The Hendrix boat from W. 11th Street received the “Most Patriotic” award, with their theme of “Imagine Peace on Earth.” On board were Beryl and Mike Long, Susan Tinsley, Brenda and Glenn Chisholm, Tony and Jane Byers, Gene and Rose Mary Hendrix.

    The Linda Lewis/Peter Bogetti boat, which has won “Best in Show” for the past two years, took the “Most Creative” award this year for their theme “Wacky Winter Wonderland.” Aboard were Linda Lewis, Peter Bogetti, Danielle Lewis, Aidan O’Neill, Sydney O’Neill, Chris Davidson and Marcy O’Neill Davidson.

    The Mink family of S. Anchorage took the award for “Funniest” boat, with their crab theme.

    Later that evening, participants celebrated with an awards ceremony featuring hot dogs, chips and beverages at town hall.

    The Town also thanked all the people who came out to watch and support the boat parade. They said the number of spectators seems to be increasing each year as they enjoy a parade in their own back yard.

    Additional thanks was offered to Bobbe Stephan, Hugh and Ginny Meade, Carol Stevenson, Linda Lewis, Dave Wilson, Elizabeth Hobbs, Terry Conway, Joe Conway and Rob Youngs.

    The Boat Parade Committee encouraged all residents and property owners to start brainstorming boat themes for next year and join in the fun.


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  • 07/14/16--11:45: Lessons in perspective
  • Coastal Point • Submitted: Ashleigh White and classmates get ready to go dolphin- and whale-watching in the Moray Firth of the North Sea off Inverness, Scotland.Coastal Point • Submitted: Ashleigh White and classmates get ready to go dolphin- and whale-watching in the Moray Firth of the North Sea off Inverness, Scotland.Indian River High School graduate and rising Flager College junior Ashleigh White left for her study-abroad trip to Scotland relatively sure of a future career in business.

    She had also never witnessed firsthand a referendum by United Kingdom voters to exit the European Union, been waved to by the Queen of England during a parade or seen two policemen break an intoxicated man’s leg and subsequently drag him away, screaming, across the floor of a train station.

    That is not how she would return.

    After three weeks completing a case-study project for Prickly Thistle Scotland — a Scottish company that manufacturers and designs tartans (for kilts and more) — as well as touring the Scottish countryside with her trusty camera, being in Edinburgh during the Brexit vote and just simply getting to experience a non-American culture, it could be said that there are few things on which the 20-year-old soon-to-be-college-grad’s perspective has changed.

    Sure, she had been on resort-style vacations to places such as Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and even Mexico. But, for White, none of that compared to making her way across the pond.

    “The culture’s a lot different. It was cool to see how they lived,” said White. “Everyone was really nice over there. They have a different sense of humor from us. None of the cities over there are anything like here.”

    The project

    For her internship with Prickly Thistle, White was tasked with putting together a feasibility study concerning a possible new business venture marketing tartan materials for private jets and yachts.

    Based in Inverness for the better part of the trip’s three weeks, she and the rest of her team reached out to companies and put together a 10-page report documenting their findings and recommendations.

    “It definitely prepared me for the business world,” she said of the project.

    “We got the whole experience. We created the study, we got to see her workshop and everything that she does. We got to see every part of the business — that was really cool.”

    Once looking forward to a possible career in corporate event planning, working with private jets and yachts sparked a new interest of now going into a similar field.

    However, how she spent her free time in Scotland would also have her second guessing her future plans.

    The photography

    It was for Christmas, some now three or four years ago, that Ashleigh’s younger brother Andrew — a standout for the Indians’ football, soccer and lacrosse teams — got his first camera.

    It wasn’t long after that that she started using it, eventually becoming interested enough in photography to warrant getting her own camera.

    Down at school in St. Augustine, Fla., White will often go out on shoots, loading up memory cards with images of coastlines, sunsets and any other landscapes or native animals that she might find along the way.

    While in Inverness, however, scouring a strange new countryside, she filled up her entire laptop’s memory by shooting more than 5,000 photos.

    “The last two days, I couldn’t take pictures,” White said with a laugh. “I really appreciated the landscape.”

    Preferring to shoot landscapes over people, White said she particularly enjoyed the journey to the island of Skye — the largest island in the Inner Hebrides archipelago, connected to Scotland’s northwest coast only by bridge and known particularly for its mountainous landscapes, remote fishing villages and medieval castles.

    While the group would have to drive there on a 12-hour trip, for White, the scenery was well worth it.

    “It was so pretty. It was just gorgeous,” she explained. “It was really deserted there. There were no houses or anything, but there were so many things to take pictures of, so many mountains, waterfalls, the coastlines — everything.”

    The excursion was so impactful that it left her curious about taking her photography further.

    “This trip kind of made me want to do something more with photography,” she said. “I don’t know what I would really do. It would be awesome to be a National Geographic photographer, but I’m taking a photography class at school next semester.”

    The travel bug

    White eventually left Scotland’s wooly green countryside and unsullied islands for the country’s capital and second largest city, spending the trip’s final two days in Edinburgh.

    It’s there that she saw Queen Elizabeth II, witnessed the incident with the Scottish police and observed the people’s reaction to Brexit the day after the vote for the U.K. to leave the E.U.

    She saw protestors in the streets after they had lost their E.U.-funded jobs, listened to their not-so-fair-spoken thoughts on Donald Trump when he was there to open a golf course the same day, and even once had to wait an hour and a half for a bagel, thanks to some shoddy restaurant service.

    However, through it all — and whether or not her future plans will include business or photography, or maybe even something completely new — one thing is for sure: those plans will almost certainly include seeing some more of what the world has to offer.

    “It just put my life into perspective — the world is huge,” White said, noting that she’d like to take some time off when she graduates from Flagler a full year early next spring and visit countries including Iceland and Greece.

    “There’s so many different places you could go. It was awesome. It was such a fun trip. It made me definitely want to travel more and see everything.”


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    Coastal Point • Submitted: A Delaware State Fire Police vehicle is ready to serve.Coastal Point • Submitted: A Delaware State Fire Police vehicle is ready to serve.In the State of Delaware, a group of dedicated volunteers is tasked with providing both traffic and crowd control at the scene of any event in which the fire department has been summoned. In addition, they are utilized at many special events throughout Sussex and neighboring counties.

    Many residents are new to Sussex County, and for new residents and annual vacationers, the sight of a common-looking vehicle with blue flashing emergency lights may a shock. Why? Because these vehicles are personally owned, and range from subcompact cars to large trucks. The drivers are all members of a local volunteer fire company. They have the authority to arrest any individual who fails to comply with their lawful command.

    Many of those who have recently relocated to Sussex County from out of state may have never observed the fire-police in action. In Delaware, the public may observe these men and women frequently, since they respond directly to a fire alarm or vehicular collision.

    Each fire company also maintains a vehicle officially marked as “Traffic Control” that is equipped with both audible siren and flashing emergency lights. These privately-owned fire-police vehicles are outfitted with blue flashing lights only. They are not emergency vehicles per Delaware statute, but motorists are asked to provide them the right of way as they are responding to a fire or accident scene. It is always a good thought to consider — it may be your house one day.

    They benefit the public in numerous respects. Fire-police are sworn volunteers; they are not being compensated by the State of Delaware. That itself is an enormous savings to the taxpayer. Their presence permits law-enforcement officers to remain available to respond to other emergency calls in the area, not standing for hours directing traffic at a fire scene.

    EMS Chief John Watson of the Millville Volunteer Fire Company stated, “The success of both the firefighters and residents in an emergency situation falls clearly on the shoulders of the fire-police and their well-honed skills in controlling a fire or accident scene.”

    Fire-police officer Virginia Childers Davidson, from the Bethany Beach Volunteer Fire Company — one of a few female fire-police officers — maintains, “My greatest difficulty is motorists stopping to ask directions when I’m detouring traffic. My suggestion is they find a safe location to stop, and utilize Google Maps or other internet map applications. This would allow for the free flow of vehicular traffic.”


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    Coastal Point • Submitted: The rescued great horned owl in the back yard of her boyfriend Kevin. The owl will be nursed back to full health and released by Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research.Coastal Point • Submitted: The rescued great horned owl in the back yard of her boyfriend Kevin. The owl will be nursed back to full health and released by Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research.A couple of weeks ago, what started as a typical drive to work for one local woman turned into a search-and-rescue mission for a great horned owl — an animal the woman, Kim, said she’s always been passionate about.

    Early in the morning, Kim got a call from her distressed boyfriend, who said that there was some kind of injured bird in his back yard. With the help of her boss at South Shore Lawncare, Kim commandeered a makeshift rescue kit of gloves, towels and a carrier for the injured creature, and set off to locate the owl.

    After fighting through the pouring rain to search the woods behind her boyfriend’s house, to no avail, they called it quits for a few hours, determined to pick back up when the weather cleared up.

    According to Kim, “These kinds of owls don’t come out during the day, and they don’t like the rain, so he was probably hiding.”

    After moving their search deeper and deeper into the woods at the edge of the property, Kim and her boss, Kevin, began to hear what she described as a “whining, crying sound.”

    Instinctively, Kim was convinced that if they continued to follow the noise, they would find their owl as well. Sure enough, after hours of searching, around 3 p.m., she stepped on a hollowed out log and stirred the owl from his hiding place in a nearby bush.

    “He landed right in front of me,” she said.

    Approaching with care, Kim said she got close enough to throw a towel around the injured animal before Kevin scooped it up. Keeping the owl’s sharp claws wrapped snuggly in towels and blankets, they called Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, who sent a volunteer to transport the owl from Frankford to an animal hospital in Newark.

    While they were waiting, Kim said, she got to hold the owl the whole time.

    “He was so sweet — he didn’t try to attack and was very calm,” she said. “We calmed him down. This owl was taking selfies with me. He was sweet as can be. I think he knew he was injured and he needed to be helped, so he was letting us care for him.”

    According to Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, the owl is now on the path to recovery, thanks to the efforts of Kim and her boss. She said she’s been told that, had they not taken the initiative to locate and rescue the injured animal, it likely would’ve died.

    Of the extent of the owl’s injuries, a representative from Tri-State told Kim that, while it suffered no broken bones, it was being treated for parasites and an ulcer on its left cornea, as well as “capture myopathy,” which is extreme stress that can lead to muscle damage.

    Kim said that, once the owl has been nursed back to full health, she hopes to be able to attend its release back into the wild.


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    Delaware Seashore State Park will host the sixth annual Maritime Heritage Festival at the Indian River Life-Saving Station Museum from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, July 17. The festival brings history alive in unique ways; families can experience the rich history of the Delaware coast through crafts, games, prizes, food, music and demonstrations throughout the day.

    The highlight of the festival will be the Breeches Buoy Rescue Demonstration, performed by park staff and active-duty Coast Guardsmen. They will fire a historic “Lyle Gun,” a line-throwing cannon used to fire a projectile attached to a rope to a boat or victim in distress. Lyle guns, used as the preferred rescue method of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, helped save lives from the late 19th century all the way until 1952.

    This year’s festival will showcase three new or improved museum exhibits that were made possible through the National Park Service’s Maritime Heritage Grant Program. The Life-Saving Station was awarded $25,000 last year to put toward refurbishing the existing flag tower, restoring the 1914 Stieff piano and purchasing a custom-made reproduction of a Life-Saving Service beach cart.

    Alongside the existing exhibits at the museum on Sunday will be a traveling exhibit from the Treasures of the Sea museum at Delaware Technical Community College’s Owens Campus in Georgetown.

    The Treasures of the Sea exhibit features treasures recovered from the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha, which sank in a brutal storm off the coast of Florida on Sept. 6, 1622. The ship, bound from Havana, Cuba, to Seville, Spain, had been laden with treasure — gold, silver ingots, emeralds and jewelry — when it crashed on a coral reef. The search for its remains kept treasure-seekers hunting for 360 years.

    Although the shipwreck was found in Florida, it has a Delaware connection. In the early 1980s, treasure hunter Mel Fisher, researcher Eugene Lyons and investor Melvin Joseph Sr. of Georgetown teamed up in and eventually recovered more than 1,000 silver bars, 180,000 silver coins and a number of bronze cannons from the shipwreck.

    Today, more than $4 million in artifacts, including silver ingots and coins, bronze cannons, gold coins and chains, silver artifacts, deep green emeralds from South America and religious articles, are featured in the permanent display housed in the library building at Delaware Technical Community College in Georgetown.

    Part of that exhibit will be featured at the Maritime Heritage Festival, which will also feature giveaways, presentations and activities for children, such as a treasure hunt in the sand.

    The celebration will also feature guest speakers from DNREC’s Division of Parks & Recreation’s Cultural Resources office, the U.S. Life-Saving Service Heritage Association and Scott Ernst Custom Woodworks to discuss how the grant funds were used to complete the projects exhibit renovations.

    There will be entertainment for all ages throughout the day, including storyteller and musician Matthew Dodd, who will return to perform “Songs & Stories of Old Sailing Days” while dressed in sailor garb, and a show of historic sea shanties and stories to entertain kids of all ages.

    Between shows, visitors can check out displays and family-friendly activities from local museums, historical societies and maritime organizations.

    The schedule for the day is as follows:

    • Noon — Doors open, all exhibits and activities open, museum tours start. Matthew Dodd begins performance of “Songs of Old Sailing Days,” which is an interactive performance for all ages

    • 1:30 p.m. — Guest speakers from the Office of Cultural Resources, the U.S. Life-Saving Service Heritage Association and Scott Ernst Custom Woodworks (which built the reproduction United States Life Saving Service beach cart exhibit).

    • 2 p.m. — Activities and Matthew Dodd performance continue.

    • 3 p.m. — Breeches Buoy Rescue Drill Reenactment

    • 3:30 p.m. — Announcement of the raffle winners, with activities continuing until 4 p.m.

    The schedule is subject to change, as weather might be a factor in some of the activities.

    The activities will include a life-sized board game, “sailor tattoo” face painting, 19th century colonial games, a raffle and much more. Food will also be available for purchase, including crab cake sandwiches, fish tacos, and lobster rolls from SoDel Concepts’ Big Thunder Roadside Kitchen

    The Indian River Life-Saving Station is located 3.5 miles south of Dewey Beach and 1.5 miles north of the Indian River Inlet Bridge on Route 1. Admission to the festival is free. For more information, contact the Indian River Life-Saving Station at Delaware Seashore State Park, at (302) 227-6991.

    For more information on the Indian River Life-Saving Station, visit www.destateparks.com/park/delaware-seashore/life-saving-station.asp. For more information on the Treasures of the Sea at Delaware Tech, call (302) 259-6150 or visit www.treasuresofthesea.org.
    By Kerin Magill

    Staff Reporter

    Delaware Seashore State Park will host the sixth annual Maritime Heritage Festival at the Indian River Life-Saving Station Museum from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, July 17. The festival brings history alive in unique ways; families can experience the rich history of the Delaware coast through crafts, games, prizes, food, music and demonstrations throughout the day.

    The highlight of the festival will be the Breeches Buoy Rescue Demonstration, performed by park staff and active-duty Coast Guardsmen. They will fire a historic “Lyle Gun,” a line-throwing cannon used to fire a projectile attached to a rope to a boat or victim in distress. Lyle guns, used as the preferred rescue method of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, helped save lives from the late 19th century all the way until 1952.

    This year’s festival will showcase three new or improved museum exhibits that were made possible through the National Park Service’s Maritime Heritage Grant Program. The Life-Saving Station was awarded $25,000 last year to put toward refurbishing the existing flag tower, restoring the 1914 Stieff piano and purchasing a custom-made reproduction of a Life-Saving Service beach cart.

    Alongside the existing exhibits at the museum on Sunday will be a traveling exhibit from the Treasures of the Sea museum at Delaware Technical Community College’s Owens Campus in Georgetown.

    The Treasures of the Sea exhibit features treasures recovered from the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha, which sank in a brutal storm off the coast of Florida on Sept. 6, 1622. The ship, bound from Havana, Cuba, to Seville, Spain, had been laden with treasure — gold, silver ingots, emeralds and jewelry — when it crashed on a coral reef. The search for its remains kept treasure-seekers hunting for 360 years.

    Although the shipwreck was found in Florida, it has a Delaware connection. In the early 1980s, treasure hunter Mel Fisher, researcher Eugene Lyons and investor Melvin Joseph Sr. of Georgetown teamed up in and eventually recovered more than 1,000 silver bars, 180,000 silver coins and a number of bronze cannons from the shipwreck.

    Today, more than $4 million in artifacts, including silver ingots and coins, bronze cannons, gold coins and chains, silver artifacts, deep green emeralds from South America and religious articles, are featured in the permanent display housed in the library building at Delaware Technical Community College in Georgetown.

    Part of that exhibit will be featured at the Maritime Heritage Festival, which will also feature giveaways, presentations and activities for children, such as a treasure hunt in the sand.

    The celebration will also feature guest speakers from DNREC’s Division of Parks & Recreation’s Cultural Resources office, the U.S. Life-Saving Service Heritage Association and Scott Ernst Custom Woodworks to discuss how the grant funds were used to complete the projects exhibit renovations.

    There will be entertainment for all ages throughout the day, including storyteller and musician Matthew Dodd, who will return to perform “Songs & Stories of Old Sailing Days” while dressed in sailor garb, and a show of historic sea shanties and stories to entertain kids of all ages.

    Between shows, visitors can check out displays and family-friendly activities from local museums, historical societies and maritime organizations.

    The schedule for the day is as follows:

    • Noon — Doors open, all exhibits and activities open, museum tours start. Matthew Dodd begins performance of “Songs of Old Sailing Days,” which is an interactive performance for all ages

    • 1:30 p.m. — Guest speakers from the Office of Cultural Resources, the U.S. Life-Saving Service Heritage Association and Scott Ernst Custom Woodworks (which built the reproduction United States Life Saving Service beach cart exhibit).

    • 2 p.m. — Activities and Matthew Dodd performance continue.

    • 3 p.m. — Breeches Buoy Rescue Drill Reenactment

    • 3:30 p.m. — Announcement of the raffle winners, with activities continuing until 4 p.m.

    The schedule is subject to change, as weather might be a factor in some of the activities.

    The activities will include a life-sized board game, “sailor tattoo” face painting, 19th century colonial games, a raffle and much more. Food will also be available for purchase, including crab cake sandwiches, fish tacos, and lobster rolls from SoDel Concepts’ Big Thunder Roadside Kitchen

    The Indian River Life-Saving Station is located 3.5 miles south of Dewey Beach and 1.5 miles north of the Indian River Inlet Bridge on Route 1. Admission to the festival is free. For more information, contact the Indian River Life-Saving Station at Delaware Seashore State Park, at (302) 227-6991.

    For more information on the Indian River Life-Saving Station, visit www.destateparks.com/park/delaware-seashore/life-saving-station.asp. For more information on the Treasures of the Sea at Delaware Tech, call (302) 259-6150 or visit www.treasuresofthesea.org.


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  • 07/14/16--13:22: Traveling with a purpose
  • Special to the Coastal Point • Amanda Zirn: Above, a baby sea turtle is released after hatching in a safe location, away from poachers and predators. Special to the Coastal Point • Amanda Zirn: Above, a baby sea turtle is released after hatching in a safe location, away from poachers and predators. In a little more than a week, 26-year-old Amanda Zirn will be headed to Peru for 10 days — not to enjoy sandy beaches or tour ruins, but to volunteer.

    “If you’re going to travel, it would also be awesome to help other people, especially when you’re going to these Third World countries and seeing how they live and how comfortably we live. If you can do something while you’re there, it just makes it so much better.”

    Zirn will be traveling to Cusco to work with young children through a volunteer program called International Volunteer HQ, which is an international volunteer organization working in more than 30 countries that sends thousands of volunteers abroad annually.

    “I volunteered back in 2010 and went through a similar program. So I knew of Volunteer HQ, but I had never used them before. They always had very great reviews… They have one of the best overall reviews from past volunteers, so I decided to go with them,” said Zirn.

    In 2010, Zirn and her brother Trevor volunteered in Costa Rica at a sea turtle hatchery.

    “Costa Rica has a large underground poaching movement, where people go on the beaches and try to take the sea turtle eggs right after they’re laid. They’re considered a delicacy and sold on the black market, which is terrible, because the sea turtle population is declining and it’s very important we do everything we can to save them.

    “So we would go out at night and find mothers laying the eggs, or nests where eggs had just been laid, and we would move the eggs into our hatchery and remake the nest according to the measurements that the mother had made, and then we would bury them.

    “They were protected from poachers, wild dogs, things like that, so they were in a safe environment for them to develop fully and safely hatch. Then, when they started hatching, we would take them down to the ocean and make sure they all got into the water. That’s what we did every year.”

    As it was her first experience abroad, Zirn said she was somewhat shocked experiencing a Third World country firsthand.

    “I cried for the first few days. It was my first time out of the country, and it wasn’t even that bad. We just live so comfortably here, and I don’t think a lot of us… We all know it, but we’ve never had to live otherwise.

    “And there was a moment when I went and volunteered at a hospital for the day, and when we left, they handed me and the other girl I was volunteering with a banana as a ‘thank-you’ for volunteering. It was the end of my stay. I was there for four weeks. And I was so excited to get that banana. It was like a little dessert.

    “We were living on rice and beans, just local food, which was delicious but not as extravagant as home. When we were walking back to the volunteer house, I thought how funny that would be if somebody paid you a banana here in the U.S. as a thank-you gift. You’d be like, ‘What in the world is this? Why are you giving me fruit?’ But there, it was a true thank-you.”

    While in Peru later this month, Zirn will be working in a kindergarten or an orphanage in Cusco.

    “This time, I thought it would be really amazing to work with children, just because I think you could make a larger impact on someone’s life.”

    Along with volunteering her time, Zirn will be checking an entire suitcase of books, in both English and Spanish, to donate to the children with whom she’ll be working. Many people donated books to Zirn, and she was able to purchase some herself. Books donated that do not make the trek to Peru will instead be donated to Read Aloud Delaware, a nonprofit organization working to ensure that each preschool child in Delaware is regularly read to, one-on-one.

    Some of the titles she’ll be taking with her (in Spanish) include “Harry Potter,” “Charlotte’s Web,” “Ramona,” “The Mouse on the Motorcycle” and “Fancy Nancy.”

    “I’m excited to see the children’s reaction to them,” she said.

    Over the last few months, Zirn raised funds to pay for her volunteer adventure, which included airfare, two meals a day and a place to stay. Although she needed to raise $790 to pay for her volunteer trip, Zirn has raised $1,000.

    The additional monetary donations will be used to purchase vitamins (children’s, adult and prenatal) once she’s in Peru.

    “The children in Cusco don’t really have a lot of nutrition, and health education is quite low, so any money raised after this point, I’ll take it down to Peru and use it to buy children’s One-A-Day vitamins and things like that.”

    She is also accepting donations of hygiene items, such as toothbrushes, toothpaste and small bars of soap, as well as basic medical supplies, including bandages, analgesics and antiseptics.

    Although she had a travel companion in her brother the last time she volunteered abroad, Zirn said she’s going alone this trip.

    “There’ll be someone waiting for me at the airport to pick me up,” she said. “A lot of people have been asking if I’m scared, being a young woman traveling by myself. No more scared than a boy should be. I hope this may encourage other women to do this. Other family members, like my mom and dad, have been asking, ‘Isn’t there someone who can go with you? Can’t you wait for someone to go with you?’ But if you waited every time for a travel partner… then I’d never go. I have time now, so I’m doing it.”

    Speaking limited Spanish, Zirn has been practicing for the last few months to brush up — even trying her hand at reading some of her Spanish-language children’s books.

    “I keep thinking about my Spanish teacher in high school, who was so nice. I wish I had taken the class much more seriously,” she said with a laugh. “I’ve been practicing for the last few months. In Costa Rica, which is also Spanish-speaking, I relied heavily on my brother, so I never really had to learn then.”

    One of the best things about volunteering, said Zirn, is the incredible friendships one can make with fellow volunteers from around the world.

    “From my Costa Rica trip, my brother and I ended up making friendships with the other volunteers. They were from all over the world, and since then I’ve traveled to England, Iceland and Ireland, visiting those other volunteers we made friends with,” she said, adding that her brother, on a recent trip to Southeast Asia, had the same experience. “Now he has people he can go see in Germany and Norway, things like that. It’s really awesome.

    “We’ve had a few friends come to visit us — they’ve come to New York City, and we’ve gone up to see them. Making friendships across the globe is just so cool.”

    Going to a Third World country to not simply have a holiday, but a meaningful eye-opening experience, is something for which Zirn is grateful.

    “I would walk a mile to this little hut that was literally a hut, that had dial up internet, and I would log on, but only if it was working that day… That was normal. Some of the guys we knew who gave surf lessons, their houses were the equivalent to our sheds. That, coming from such a comfortable life and being thrown into something to our standards, is not very comfortable, really tests your boundaries… You really learn a lot about yourself.

    “You don’t have Wi-Fi all the time, you have to learn to speak with people who don’t know your language and have different customs. It rounds you out.”

    Zirn said she hopes to continue her volunteering and exploring the world, with a goal of traveling to Africa to visit Tanzania next.

    “Eventually, way down the road, I’d love to start a nonprofit in the area to help kids volunteer, sponsor high school kids or kids in college to do this, because it was really eye-opening and can shape someone in those crucial years.”

    As Hans Christian Andersen once wrote, “to travel is to live,” and that is exactly how Zirn lives.

    “The world is just so big and small at the same time. It’s an addiction; I can’t stop thinking about where I’m going to go next.”

    To make a monetary donation to Zirn’s Peruvian volunteer trip, visit www.gofundme.com/pagesforperu. To follow along with Zirn as she travels the globe, visit www.azandtheatlas.com.


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  • 07/14/16--13:37: Agenda — July 15, 2016
  • Bethany Beach

    • The next regular meeting of the Bethany Beach Town Council will be at town hall on Friday, July 15, at 2 p.m. The agenda for the meeting includes discussion, consideration and possible votes on: a contract submitted by Regional Builders Inc. to construct a pre-engineered steel building for the Town’s Blackwater complex for $344,506; a contract submitted by H.A. DeHart & Son for a Pak-Mor high-compaction side-load refuse compactor for $84,940; a contract submitted by Barr Freightliner for a 2017 Freightliner conventional truck chassis for $109,100; and a contract submitted by Hoober Inc. for a 2016 Farmall tractor for $51,750.

    • The Bethany Beach Planning Commission is scheduled to meet on Saturday, July 16, at 9 a.m. at town hall.

    • The Bethany Beach Budget & Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, July 19, at 9 a.m. at town hall. The agenda for the meeting includes a final review of the 2016 fiscal year, a review of the first quarter of the 2017 fiscal year and a discussion of the difference between private and public accounting.

    • Bethany Beach’s annual town council election will to take place Saturday, Sept. 10, from noon to 6 p.m. Anyone wishing to file as a candidate for the election must file a written Notice of Intention (Application for Candidacy) in the town manager’s office at town hall no later than 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27.

    • The public can view on the Town website the presentation by Oasis Design Group to the Bethany Beach Town Council, soliciting input for preliminary concept development for the features and organization of “Central Park,” at the intersection of Routes 1 and 26. The URLs for the four presentation segments are http://www.townofbethanybeach.com/mediacenter.aspx?VID=30 (and 31, 32 and 33). In the coming weeks, the Town plans to send out a survey regarding specific design elements for the park.

    • Bethany Beach’s pay-to-park season resumed May 15 and runs until Sept. 15.

    • Prohibitions on dogs on the beach and boardwalk in Bethany Beach resumed on May 15.

    • The regular meetings of the Bethany Beach Town Council and Planning Commission are now being broadcast, with video, over the Internet via the Town’s website at www.townofbethanybeach.com, under Live-Audio Broadcasts. Both meetings are at town hall.

    South Bethany

    • There will be no 2016 town council election, as only four candidates registered for the four available seats: incumbent Mayor Pat Voveris as mayor, incumbent Councilwoman Sue Callaway, and incoming council members Don Boteler and William “Tim” Shaw.

    • Recycling is picked up biweekly, continuing on Friday, July 15.

    • Yard waste is picked up biweekly, continuing on Wednesday, July 20.

    • The town council’s next workshop meeting is Thursday, July 28, at 2 p.m.

    • The town council’s next regular meeting is Friday, Aug. 12, at 7 p.m.

    • Town Hall is now open Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., without closing for lunch.

    • The Cat Hill barricade hours have been changed to 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for traffic turning from Kent Avenue onto Black Gum Drive.

    • Yoga on the beach is held Wednesdays from 8 to 8:45 a.m. at S. 4th Street. Boot Camp on the beach is Mondays and Fridays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. Donations are accepted as payment. Bring water and a towel.

    • Parking permit requirements have resumed for the summer. Permits are available at town hall.

    • Prohibitions on dogs on the beach resumed on May 15 and run until Oct. 15.

    • The Town of South Bethany’s website is located at www.southbethany.org.

    Fenwick Island

    • Public meetings on the Comprehensive Plan will be Saturdays, July 16 and Aug. 13, at 9 a.m.

    • A bike safety checkpoint will be held Tuesday, July 19, from 8 to 10 a.m. at Bunting Avenue and Bayard Street.

    • A community branding workshop has been scheduled for July 22 at 2 p.m. at Town Hall.

    • The town council’s next regular meeting is Friday, July 22, at 3:30 p.m.

    • Fenwick Flicks is set for Wednesday, July 27, on the beach at 8 p.m. Attendees can bring blankets, chairs, snacks, etc., for the free showing of “Inside Out” at Bayard Street and the beach.

    • The Charter & Ordinance Committee will meet Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 9:30 a.m.

    • The town council election is scheduled for Aug. 6. Three seats are up for election, each with a two-year term. Candidates include incumbent Gardner Bunting, Vicki L. Carmean, Kevin Carouge and Bernard H. “Bernie” Merritt Jr. Incumbents Diane Tingle and Bill Weistling did not file to run for re-election. Would-be candidates Charles W. Hastings and Marc McFaul were deemed not to be eligible.

    Eligible voters must be at least 18, and either a resident, property owner or a trust designee in the town by March 1. The voter registration deadline was June 30 in person and July 8 by mail. Details are available online and at town hall. Absentee voting is allowed. An affidavit must be signed and returned to Town Hall before a ballot will be mailed. Affidavits can be found online or obtained by contacting Town Hall. Absentee ballots must be returned by noon on Aug. 5.

    • The Fenwick Island Farmers’ Market has moved to Warren’s Station, at 1406 Coastal Highway, and will be open on Mondays and Fridays, until Sept. 5, from 8 a.m. to noon.

    • Recycling is collected every Friday from May to September.

    • Parking enforcement began on May 15.

    • The Fenwick Island town website is located at www.fenwickisland.org.

    • The Town of Fenwick Island is now on Twitter, at https://twitter.com/IslandFenwick or @IslandFenwick.

    Ocean View

    • The Board of Adjustment for the Town of Ocean View will meet Thursday, July 14, at 5 p.m. at town hall.

    • The next Concert in the Park will be held Friday, July 15, at 6 p.m. in John West Park. Local group Over Time Band will perform.

    • The Ocean View Town Council will not meet in August. The next regular council meeting has been set for Tuesday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m.

    • The Ocean View Planning & Zoning Commission and Board of Adjustments will not meet in August.

    • The Town of Ocean View’s Facebook page can be found at www.facebook.com/townofoceanview.

    • The Ocean View town website is located at www.oceanviewde.com.

    Millsboro

    • The Town of Millsboro will hold its monthly council meeting on Monday, Aug. 1, at 7 p.m. at the Millsboro Town Center.

    • The Millsboro town website is located at www.millsboro.org.

    Millville

    • The town council’s next workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, July 26, at 7 p.m.

    • Town Council’s regular meeting is for Tuesday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m.

    • The Millville Farmers’ Market has been canceled for 2016, due to the Route 26 road construction and last year’s low attendance. Organizers thanked the public for their continued interest and enthusiasm.

    • The Millville town website is located at www.millville.delaware.gov.

    Frankford

    • The Town of Frankford will hold its monthly council meeting on Monday, Aug. 1, at 7 p.m. in the Frankford fire hall.

    • Curbside recycling is picked up every other Tuesday, continuing July 26.

    • The Town of Frankford website is located at www.frankfordde.us.

    Selbyville

    • The town council’s next regular meeting will be held Monday, Aug. 1, at 7 p.m.

    • Curbside recycling is collected every other Wednesday, continuing July 20.

    • The Town website is at www.TownOfSelbyville.com.

    Dagsboro

    • The Dagsboro Town Council will meet Monday, Aug. 1, at 6 p.m., at Bethel United Methodist Church.

    • The Planning & Zoning Commission will meet Wednesday, Aug. 10, at 6 p.m., at Bethel UMC.

    • There will be no town council election this year. All three incumbents re-filed for their seats, with no challengers.

    • The Town can now accept credit cards payments from citizens online. Instructions are on the Town website.

    • The Town of Dagsboro website is at www.townofdagsboro.com.

    Indian River

    School District

    • The Board of Education will meet next on Monday, July 25, at 7 p.m. at Indian River High School.

    • The district website is at www.irsd.net.

    Sussex County

    • The Sussex County Board of Adjustment will meet on Monday, July 18, at 7 p.m.

    • The Sussex County Council will meet next on July 19 at 10 a.m.

    • Agendas, minutes and audio, as well as live streaming of all County meetings, may be found online at www.sussexcountyde.gov.

    State of Delaware

    • DelDOT is set to conduct a review of all its regulations that have not been updated in the last four years and is soliciting input from the public during a three-month review period, through Sept. 1. The local public hearing is Monday, July 18, 6-7 p.m. at the DelDOT South District Administration Building, 23697 Dupont Highway, Georgetown.

    • DelDOT’s reconstruction of the intersection of Route 26 and Powell Farm/Omar Roads has been largely completed, with a new traffic signal at the intersection converted to full stop-and-go operation. Traffic accessing Omar Road at the intersection must turn onto Powell Farm Road briefly in order to proceed onto or off of Route 26 at the light.

    • Continuing work on the Route 26 Mainline Improvements Project, DelDOT has now ended daytime lane closures for the summer, returning to only utilizing overnight lane closures, though lane shifts and brief lane closures for project logistics can still be expected during the day. Motorists are being encouraged to use detour routes to avoid delays when lane closures are in place. Manholes in the project area have been raised to meet the height of the upcoming paving, so motorists should take extra care when driving over them.

    Overall, the 4-mile-long project includes the reconstruction of Route 26 (Atlantic Avenue) from Clarksville to the Assawoman Canal and will widen the existing two-lane roadway to include two 11-foot travel lanes with 5-foot shoulder/bike lanes and a 12-foot wide continuous shared center left-turn lane. Construction is expected to be largely complete mid-summer and completed by the fall. George & Lynch is building the 4-plus-mile project from Assawoman Canal in Bethany Beach to St. George’s U.M. Church in Clarksville.

    Regular Route 26 project meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. at Bethany Beach Town Hall. The public is being encouraged to attend or to get email updates from DelDOT via the project page for the Route 26 project at www.deldot.gov. For additional Route 26 project information or concerns, residents and businesses can contact Ken Cimino at (302) 616-2621, or Kenneth.cimino@aecom.com or at 17 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 2, in Ocean View.


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    The Delaware State Police Collision Reconstruction Unit this week was investigating a single-vehicle crash in which a 40-year-old Preston, Md., man was killed after having led local police on a chase throughout the area.

    According to the DSP, around 11:24 p.m. on Friday, July 8, Dagsboro police began pursuing a 1996 Ford Explorer for multiple traffic violations, including driving the wrong way on a divided highway. Police said that pursuit moved through several municipalities before heading onto Route 113 northbound, approaching Frankford.

    The DSP reported that the driver of the vehicle lost control when attempting to perform an abrupt lane change, and as a result, the Explorer began to rotate clockwise before overturning several times as it crossed over the intersection of Daisey Street. The SUV, they said, landed on its roof and came to a stop on the north edge of Daisey Street in the grass.

    The operator, who was not properly restrained, police noted, was ejected from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. He was later identified as Edward Wallace Jones, 40, of Preston, Md.

    The Collision Reconstruction Unit was continuing its investigation into the incident this week. Police said it was unknown at this time if alcohol or drugs were a contributing factor in the incident.

    Route 113 northbound at Daisey Street was closed for approximately three hours while the crash was investigated and cleared.

    Natural Resources Police arrest five men at parking area

    Division of Parks & Recreation Natural Resources Police have arrested five men this month in an ongoing anti-lewdness campaign run operating out of the Wolfe Neck parking area near an intersection with the Junction & Breakwater Trail.

    The men — three from Delaware, two from Maryland and all older than 59 — were charged with lewdness-related offenses, ranging from offensive touching; criminal solicitation; lewdness and indecent exposure; and loitering to engage in or solicit sex.

    Parks Police Chief Wayne Kline said that, in spite of crackdowns there by Natural Resources Police over the last year, DNREC continues to receive complaints from the neighboring public about such illicit activity in the Wolfe Neck area.

    “Thus we are continuing operations against a serious and longstanding problem with lewd and indecent public behavior there,” Kline said. “Such behavior will not be tolerated in a public area within a Delaware State Park. Every arrest that we’ve made and may make as this enforcement operation continues reiterates that we are committed to eliminating this problem in a public area.”

    DNREC has deployed incremental enforcement tactics over the last 15 months to rid the area of such behavior, including posting of “No Loitering” signs and increased patrol activity. Kline said DNREC’s campaign to prevent public lewdness in the Wolfe Neck area has made use of both uniformed and plainclothes officers, and will continue to do so.

    One of the men arrested there this month was taken to Justice of the Peace Court 3 on charges that included disregarding a police officer’s signal, which is a felony, and an assortment of moving vehicle violations. He was released on $4,900 bond, pending arraignment in Superior Court.

    The other four men were released on a criminal summons with pending court appearances at Justice of the Peace Court 2. They face punishment ranging from a year in jail and fines up to $2,300 for a Class A misdemeanor; of up to six months in jail and fine of $1,150 for a Class B misdemeanor; up to 30 days in jail and a $575 fine for an unclassified misdemeanor; and up to one year probation and a $345 fine for a violation.

    Pedestrians arrested after suspected meth found in suitcases

    The Delaware State Police reported this week that they had arrested two people after a traffic stop revealed suspected methamphetamine in their suitcases.

    According to the DSP, on Friday, July 8, around 6:34 p.m., a trooper on patrol in the area of John J. Williams Highway (Route 24) just east of Indian Mission Road (Route 5) observed two pedestrians walking along the shoulder with suitcases.

    A traffic stop was conducted on the pedestrians and, upon the officer attempting to identify the two, they both allegedly gave false names. A search was conducted on the suitcases, revealing .88 grams of suspected methamphetamine, as well as suspected equipment and component mixtures of the manufacturing stages of meth, along with suspected key ingredients in making the drug.

    The two subjects, who were later identified as Christopher A. Biddinger, 28, and Victoria L. Barbati, 21, both of Muncy, Pa., were transported to Troop 4 in Georgetown, where they were both charged with Operating a Clandestine Laboratory, Possession with Intent to Deliver a Controlled Substance (Meth), Conspiracy 2nd, Criminal Impersonation and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. They were both remanded to the Delaware Department of Corrections in lieu of $23,100 secured bond.

    Detectives assigned to the Delaware State Police Sussex County Drug Unit, with the assistance of DNREC, responded to the scene to assist with the investigation. No evacuations were ordered and no roadways were closed, as it was determined that there was no immediate hazard to nearby residents.

    Suspect in golf cart/car thefts apprehended

    Nathan E. Lewandowski, 26, with a last known address in Millsboro, was arrested by Delaware State Police Detectives on Thursday July 7, after he was extradited back to Delaware from Camden County, N.J.

    Lewandowski was charged with two counts of Theft of a Motor Vehicle, stemming from an incident that occurred on June 27, around 11:15 a.m., in which he allegedly stole a golf cart from a victim who was actively playing golf at Baywood Greens near Millsboro.

    Police said he allegedly drove the golf cart off the golf course toward the parking lot, where he then allegedly removed a set of vehicle keys placed in the storage compartment of the golf cart, located the victim’s truck by using the key fob and then entered the vehicle and drove away. The truck was later located in Camden, N.J.

    Lewandowski was also charged with Possession of a Deadly Weapon During the Commission of a Felony, Aggravated Menacing, Carrying a Concealed Deadly Weapon, Burglary 2nd, four counts of Theft and Offensive Touching, from three other separate incidents in and around the Long Neck area that occurred during June.

    Lewandowski was committed to Sussex Correctional Institution on $43,101 secured bond.


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    Some Selbyville residents are concerned about increased crime and suspicious figures on the western side of town. At the July 11 town council meeting, two residents from Hosier Street Ext. described suspected criminal activity on the street, which leads into Maryland, including stolen medications, drug overdoses and a high-speed police chase.

    They said they don’t see much police action on their side of the road, although Police Chief W. Scott Collins said much money and patrol time has been invested in nearby neighborhoods.

    “Call us when they’re out there,” Collins responded to the complaints about loiterers. “We get calls all the time” and drive out to check the situation, he said.

    These residents aren’t alone in having concerns.

    “It’s going on a lot of places,” Mayor Clifton Murray said of seemingly suspicious activity, including on Polly Branch Road and S. Main Street.

    Also, drug overdoses don’t necessarily have legal consequences, Collins noted.

    “If someone overdoses and you call for someone in your house, you are immune from prosecution,” he said. “The point is to get help there to save someone’s life.”

    The Selbyville Police Department did get some love, too, as residents expressed gratitude in general to the police, and to the Town for funding its own law enforcement.

    In other Selbyville Town Council news:

    • Very popular in various neighborhoods, the electronic speed trailer is making the rounds for traffic enforcement. But don’t expect cops to stake out those same spots.

    Collins reminded the public, “You’re losing some of the [live] patrol when you put the sign out there.”

    Also, seatbelt and DUI enforcement campaigns begin later this month.

    • Mountaire is close to being fined for breach of contract with the Town, according to Councilman Frank Smith III.

    Tractor-trailer loads of live chickens should be parked in a cooling shed, Smith said. But the timing doesn’t always allow for that, said Mountaire’s Jay Griffith. That’s why chickens were recently parked outside on hot days, under fans.

    “We’re trying to do the best we can,” Griffith said. “It was that or let ’em die.”

    Parking the loads of live chickens outside violates parking rules written into a 2013 operating agreement, which Mountaire and the Town approved when the poultry processing company added on when building a new indoor parking facility.

    Smith said he was frustrated, expecting that Mountaire, rather than improving things, will just view any monetary fines as a necessary evil.

    “‘It’s just going to be a cost of doing business,’ which is what I heard Mountaire say when I was doing sewers,” Smith said of the company’s previous non-compliance issues.

    Mountaire has a new proposal that would “get the fans off that property,” Griffith said.

    “You’re in violation of zoning by having them on there,” Smith responded. “Basically, you guys wrote that other agreement, and we tweaked it. … Now you want to discard that and start all over again.”

    “We want to make some changes, yes,” Griffith said.

    • Drivers of heavy vehicles are being asked to continue avoiding Railroad Avenue, which showed the first signs of collapse in May of 2015.

    The road crosses the Sandy Branch tax ditch, which flows west to east in a galvanized metal culvert that has begun to rust out. That caused soil and, eventually, asphalt to begin crumbling downward.

    The hole was temporarily patched and is still refilled with crushed stone as needed.

    “We’re going to watch it daily, see if we can get a plan going,” Town Administrator Michael Deal said. “It’s open to light traffic.

    … We asked Mountaire not to use it for tractor trailers or heavy traffic.”

    But a long-term solution is still in the works. Selbyville is waiting for its engineering firm, Davis, Bowen & Friedel, Inc., to submit project designs, hopefully by August, Deal said.

    Until then, the Town doesn’t even know what to expect in terms of repair costs or time estimates.

    Engineering alone could cost $52,000, while construction itself could range from $300,000 to $500,000, according to Town Administrator Michael Deal.

    Apparently, the Sandy Branch switches from two pipes to three pipes in the vicinity of Railroad Avenue, a two-lane road running parallel to and between the railroad track and the Mountaire processing plant. The pipe continues under Mountaire and Southern Delaware School of the Arts properties.

    • Four new fire hydrants may be coming to town. In particular, Duncan said, one out-of-commission hydrant will be replaced by week’s end, at the corner of Main Street and Lighthouse Road.

    Some hydrants are so old that replacing them might be easier than tracking down replacement parts, officials noted.

    • The wastewater treatment plant got a positive report from the Surface Water Discharges Section of Delaware Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control. A June inspection showed good operations, techniques and recordkeeping. The only observed deficiency was a storage tank that lacked a label.

    “The team did a good job back there. They always do a good job,” said Smith.

    • Bulk trash is collected on the first Wednesday of each month. Each month, households may put out one bulk item, such as a television.

    • Mayor Murray said the town had another successful Old Timers Day festival, thanks to the Bethany-Fenwick Area Chamber of Commerce and Town staff.

    • The Selbyville PD will once again purchase a new police vehicle with the annual Sussex County municipal police grant of $25,000.

    Collins said the Town has six full-time officers, three regular part-timers and six part-timers who Mountaire contracts solely for company security.

    • The residents at 8 N. Main Street were given three more months to make emergency home repairs, after they asked the council for additional time to repair a damaged and leaky roof. After mistakenly failing to get a permit for home repairs in a historic zone, they requested permission to finish repairing the roof without the heavy investment of a completely new roof.

    The Selbyville Town Council’s next regular meeting is Monday, Aug. 1, at 7 p.m.


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    An atypical Planning & Zoning meeting was held in the Town of Frankford on July 6, planned to review two applications — one for a temporary office building, the other a minor subdivision.

    The meeting started almost 30 minutes late, as there was not a quorum of members. While Commissioners Duane Beck and Ronald Hall were in attendance, Dora Bell-Isler and Jason Taylor were not present.

    Two other residents, Albert Franklin and Sabrina Simms, were contacted to come to the meeting and sit in for the absent members. There was no discussion as to whether the two had seen information related to the application prior to the meeting. Neither was sworn in.

    According to Delaware Code Title 22 § 701, “A planning commission established hereunder shall consist of not less than 5 nor more than 9 members. Such members shall in cities be appointed by the mayor, subject to confirmation by the city council, and in towns where there is not a mayor shall be elected by the town commissioners.

    “When a planning commission is first established the members thereof shall be appointed or elected for terms of such length and shall be so arranged that the term of at least 1 member shall expire each year and their successor shall be appointed or elected for terms of 2 to 5 years each.”

    Town Solicitor Chad Lingendelder was not present for the meeting; however, two council members were in attendance, as was consultant Kyle Gulbronson of AECOM.

    On the Town’s website, the last Planning & Zoning meeting held prior to July 6 was listed as March 19, 2014. As of the Coastal Point’s Wednesday deadline, town officials could not give a specific date as to when the planning commisison members were appointed by the mayor and council but said they were looking into it, as well as when the terms of the commissioners expire.

    At that meeting, the group voted to recommend approval of a minor subdivision, requested by Dean Esham, located on Green Street, with one side being left vacant and the other to be used as an overflow parking lot for the library. Subsequently, at Tuesday’s meeting, the council voted unanimously to approve the minor subdivision.

    The commission also recommended the council approve a site plan for a three-unit, 2,130-square-foot modular office building that would have offices, a conference room and restroom facilities, with the provision that the skirting be approved by the Town and resemble a permanent foundation base.

    The council voted unanimously to approve the site plan, which would be approved for two years following the issuance of a permit.

    The council had planned to hold a first reading to amend Ordinance 34, which would raise water rates in the town, and Ordinance 35, related to drilling wells within town limits; however, the items were not properly noticed. The council did, however, go on to discuss the items at length.

    The water rates would be increased to $12.68 per 1,000 gallons used, with a monthly charge of $3 per dwelling unit.

    “The purpose of this ordinance is to increase water being provided to the residents in the town of Frankford, due to the loss of use from Mountaire,” said Council President Joanne Bacon. “Even though the current rate is $8.75 per 1,000 gallons, no official ordinance was passed by the Town of Frankford, and only temporary resolutions were enacted, raising the water rate to $5, and again to $8.75 between 2000 and 2016.”

    Councilman Greg Welch said the council came up with the amount of gallons the Town needs to pump to make the water department operate in the black and divided it by the rate, which is how the $12.68 came to be. He said the deficit is $71,000 at this time.

    “We are going to closely monitor it and drop it as soon as we can.”

    Councilman Marty Presley said the council had also discussed creating a sunset provision for the rate increase.

    Resident Liz Carpenter asked the council if they’ve considered selling the water department to Tidewater.

    “It’s a cancer,” she said. “Frankly, this water rate hike further serves to devalue my property. Now I’m even less likely to sell my house.”

    Presley said the sunset provision is not written in the proposed ordinance but that the council would add it. He also said the increase would be “temporary” and would be reduced as fast as possible.

    Esham told the council they should not sell a utility, but said if Mountaire was the cause of the loss of revenue, the Town should look at recouping those funds by other means.

    “If Mountaire is really putting an extra $250 a year on every resident in town, they need to pay. They’re not a good neighbor; they’re not an asset to the town,” he said. “If they were a good neighbor and doing something wrong, that would be one thing, but they’re not a good neighbor… Stick it to them. You put a 2 percent tax on rentals, make an industrial tax.”

    “I don’t think that’s fair to do that to someone who’s been here,” said Wesley Hayes. “If they were up and leave right now, where would we be right now?”

    Carpenter asked if there were any conversations regarding long-term strategic planning. Presley said the Town has taken some starting steps with such things as the Envision Frankford group and purchasing land for park parking. He said the Town can look at revising its Comprehensive Plan to better reflect the growth the Town hopes to see in future years.

    The two soon-to-be-proposed ordinances are expected to be on the Aug. 1 council agenda.

    In other Town news:

    • The council said they received a preliminary audit report from the State and will be responding as soon as possible.

    • Police Chief Michael Warchol who announced he would be leaving the Town to move to Baltimore and will most likely leave in the middle of August. Currently, there are five applicants who will be interviewed by the chief and two members of the council.


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    Millville Mini Storage has gotten the green light for three new storage buildings at 35101 Atlantic Avenue (Route 26).

    The Millville Town Council approved the final site plans at their June 12 meeting.

    The three new buildings will be 2,500 square feet each, with a center hallway allowing clients access to their units from the inside. There will be exterior doors on both ends of the buildings. The 7,500 square feet is in addition to the existing 35,432 square feet of storage already offered.

    During the discussion by the council, there was some debate about the on-site commercial trash bin. During preliminary site plan approvals in November of 2015, the council had requested that the bin be surrounded by an enclosure.

    But designers interpreted that to mean that the primary goal was to hide the bin from sight, which they did by moving the bin to a central location, surrounded on all sides by the storage units.

    Although unsightliness for the neighbors was a concern, council members said the purpose of the requested enclosure was to prevent trash from escaping the bin and blowing across the property.

    An enclosure won’t completely prevent trash from escaping before the weekly pickup, especially if people don’t dispose of garbage properly, warned property owner Peter Astorino and Jeff Clark of Land Tech Land Planning.

    But they obliged to build an enclosure, approximately 6 feet high, meeting the height of the existing fence.

    Councilman Steven Small suggested the business be a “good neighbor” by installing a vegetative barrier, to improve the overall visuals of the overall property. He said he was satisfied to hear the owner acknowledge the suggestion.

    The final site plan was approved, with a three-sided dumpster enclosure, 4-0-1, with Mayor Robert “Bob” Gordon recusing himself as a neighbor of the property. All other regulator agency approvals have been obtained for Millville Mini Storage LLC (formerly Two Mini Inc.).


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    Ocean View officials met with the Millville Volunteer Fire Company recently to discuss a proposed contract for the $35-per-property ambulance service fee proposed by the fire company.

    “While, in general, the council liked the theory of it, we had a lot of questions at that time,” said Mayor Walter Curran at the town council’s monthly meeting on July 12. “We had about an hour and a half filling in the blanks.”

    Curran said that, while the idea of placing a $35 tax on all improved properties in town to pay for ambulance service has been discussed, nothing has been set in stone. All council members will have the opportunity to review a revised proposed contract and give their comments before any other step is made.

    Curran said there is certainly some apprehension for some, given the recent release of an audit that found that a member of the fire company had allegedly stolen more than $190,000 in fire company funds.

    “We know where every penny of the Town’s money has gone in the past,” said Curran. “This particular tax will be for the ambulance service only.”

    He added that ambulance calls have gone up dramatically in recent years, and the fire company is looking to keep up with the demand.

    “Almost 40 percent of the calls are outside of the town of Ocean View and Millville,” said Councilman Tom Maly. “How they’re going to incorporate those properties into this?”

    Curran said the department will solicit them as part of their annual ambulance subscription service.

    “County Council is now paying much more attention that maybe this should be a countywide system,” he said. “That would force everybody who is a recipient of the services to pay their fair share. Millville does, too; we know that.”

    The council is expected to resume discussions of the fee in September. If the council plans to vote on accepting a contract with the fire company, a public hearing process will give citizens the opportunity to comment.

    Also on July 12, Public Works Director Charles McMullen said the Town has received a number of complaints regarding speeding. While the Town has ordered more speed signs, McMullen asked the council for their views on speed bumps.

    McMullen said that on Oakwood and Daisy Avenues, drivers use the smaller roadways to cut through and speed in the process. He noted that Bethany Beach and South Bethany have used speed bumps to help deter speeding.

    “I like the idea of putting some sort of physical impediment there to get people to slow down,” said Councilman Frank Twardzik.

    “There’s no harm in trying,” added Curran.

    Council members said they would send McMullen a list of areas about which they receive complaints related to speeding, and a master list will be created in the hopes of addressing concerns.

    Beach Club asks for change in conditions

    Windansea LLC, the developer of the Ocean View Beach Club, requested to amend a condition that was placed on the property when it was annexed into the town in 2007.

    A condition of approval was that recreational facilities — for example, swimming pools and community buildings — should be constructed and opened to residents no later than the time of the issuance of the 60th certificate of occupancy.

    McMullen said the site plan was approved; however, the recreational facilities have since been revised and increased to include not only an outdoor swimming pool but indoor pool, tennis courts and bocce ball court.

    He noted that there had been discussion about changing the figure of 60 COs to 150 or possibly phasing in the amenities, per the request of the developer.

    “We have 300 units that are being built in the Ocean View Beach Club portion that is within the town limits. There’s another section of Ocean View Beach Club behind it that is not within the town limits that is going through a review in Sussex County that will add an additional 164 dwelling units,” said McMullen, adding that he has been looking at the request from all angles. “What happens if, at 59, they stop building in the part that’s in town and start building in the part that’s out of town?”

    Shawn Smith of Windansea told the council there are currently about 30 COs that have been issued, and there’s a concern about finishing a condo building that would equate to 26 COs.

    McMullen said that, if the council chooses to alter the condition, it would have to go through an ordinance.

    He suggested that council allow him, along with Town Solicitor Dennis Schrader, and perhaps a member from council, to have discussions with Windansea to hash out options. He noted that the council could approach the idea by requesting a bond be placed on the remaining portion of the community to be constructed. The council agreed to let discussions continue with staff.

    Town wrangles with sidewalks project

    Sidewalk construction has officially stalled in Ocean View, as the Town recently received a letter from the Delaware Department of Transportation, requesting an advance of $28,000 in funds prior to starting the design of Phase IV for the Streetscape Improvement Project.

    As part of the project, easements must be granted for frontage where sidewalks would be placed in town. If all easements are collected, the Town would only have to pay 20 percent of each phase, which cost approximately $1 million each.

    Curran said the letter stated that, not only would the Town need to pay $28,000 of the design cost, but if the easements are not given, the Town would be on the line for whatever costs DelDOT had incurred up until that point.

    McMullen said he disagreed with that interpretation, having been told previously that the Town would only be on the hook for the $28,000.

    “I was told that was all they would request,” he said.

    McMullen noted that once the Town stops participating in the program, they will not be able to change their minds and get the offered funding.

    “Once we’re out of this, we’re out. It’s a one-shot deal.”

    Curran said it has been a fight for the Town to get easements for every project — be it sidewalks or drainage — and, at this point, it seems as if the residents don’t want sidewalks.

    Councilman Bill Olsen said if the Town changed its sidewalk ordinance, perhaps more residents would be in favor of sidewalks.

    The council voted 4-1, with Olsen opposed, to decline paying DelDOT the $28,000.

    In other Town news:

    • The council held a moment of silence after reading the names of the officers whose lives were lost in the Dallas shootings.

    “Let’s hope sanity prevails again in our country,” said Curran.

    • The council unanimously approved a resolution regarding the boundary dispute of Millville By the Sea, located in the Town of Millville, and Fairway Village.

    • The council voted unanimously for an ordinance that would amend the Ocean View Land Use & Development Code by adding brewpubs and microbreweries as a special-exception use in the GB-1 and GB-2 General Business districts.

    • Resident Tricia Supik of William Avenue voiced her concern regarding little visible movement on removing the fire company’s remote siren in town.

    She noted that, while a task force was created and met in April, at which time the MVFC was presented with a list of questions, it had been five months since a progress report was made.

    Curran said that he had spoken with MVFC Chief Doug Scott regarding the siren. He said Scott had been rightfully distracted by the allegations of embezzlement and had assured him that answers would be given to the Town by the end of September.


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    Delaware legislators are trying to keep Delaware waterways open by doubling boater registration fees.

    The State could raise more than $1 million for a new waterway management fund, according to Senate Bill 261, sponsored by state Sen. Gerald Hocker Sr. (R-20th) of Ocean View.

    The new, additional funds would go straight into a new waterway management fund, which the Delaware Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Control (DNREC) would use specifically to maintain Delaware’s public waterways. The goal is to “preserve, maintain and enhance recreational and commercial use of the State’s waters.”

    Boaters should accept the new fee, Hocker said, because in some places, watercraft can’t get out during low tide.

    “The boaters have all agreed because they want dredging so bad,” Hocker said.

    They’d be willing to pay if they felt the money was being used properly, said state Rep. Ron Gray (R-38th), who also sponsored the bill with state Rep. Ruth Briggs King (R-37th).

    Introduced in May, the bill passed the Delaware State Legislature in June, with the required three-fifths majority. It would only need the governor’s approval to become law.

    As is the case with many of the bills passed in the recently concluded legislative session, Gov. Jack Markell is reviewing SB 261 with his staff but has not announced his plan of action yet, stated his Deputy Communications Director Jason Miller.

    When asked about the bill, several watercraft sales businesses said they hadn’t even heard about the proposed legislation.

    It’s been at least a decade since the last fee increase, Gray noted.

    “We’re still the cheapest around,” Hocker said.

    Many out-of-state owners register their boats in Delaware because it’s so inexpensive, they added. Some surrounding states charge an additional tax based on the boat’s purchase price.

    Hocker said he believes this is the only fee bill he’s ever sponsored.

    With support from DNREC, Hocker said, the bill has been considered a “department bill, but we instigated it.”

    It’s based on recommendations made by the Delaware Waterways Management & Financing Advisory Committee, which the legislature created in 2014.

    DNREC estimated additional revenue in the amount of $1,328,340 per year if the bill is signed into law. The effective date for the increases would be Jan. 1, 2017.

    The money would go into a “locked box” fund, which should prevent the State from borrowing or redirecting money to other purposes, Gray said.

    Waterway management would include “activities necessary to provide for the planning, surveying, design, engineering and construction, or other activities directly related to the maintenance of public waterways,” such as dredging, channel marking, survey work, beneficial use of sediment and removal of debris or derelict structures.

    Part of the goal is just to maintain the status quo. Due to federal funding shortages, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned to stop maintaining navigational aids on smaller waterways. Delaware is taking more responsibility for the smaller waterways that are critical to Delaware boaters but are considered small potatoes compared to larger channels that also need federal funding.

    According to the State’s fiscal report, the fee increase would affect 59,467 boaters registered in Delaware.

    The annual vessel registration fees are based on boat length and would increase as follows:

    • Class A (less than 16 feet) from $10 to $20

    • Class 1 (16 feet to less than 26 feet) from $20 to $40

    • Class 2 (26 feet to less than 40 feet) from $30 to $60

    • Class 3 (40 feet to less than 65 feet) from $50 to $100

    • Class 4 (65 feet or longer and not required to be documented) from $60 to $120.

    The measure got almost unanimous support from both parties and both chambers of the legislature. Cosponsors included six senators and nine representatives, evenly split between Democrats and Republicans.

    The Senate vote was 19-1-1, with Colin Bonini (R-16th) against and Bryant Richardson (R-21st) not voting.

    The 35-2-2 House vote came with opposition from Millsboro’s Rich Collins (R-41st) and House Minority Leader Daniel Short (R-39th). Abstentions came from Charles Potter (D-1st) and Stephanie Bolden (D-2nd). Absent were David Bentz (D-18th) and Harold Peterman (R-33rd).

    Hocker and Gray both serve on their individual chambers’ natural resources committees, which had to release the bill for a vote.

    “Supporters of the legislation say the challenge of maintaining waterways is about much more than convenience,” stated the House Republicans in an email newsletter. “They say boaters that run aground, stranding or damaging their crafts due to shallow water, will take their vessels and money elsewhere — significantly impacting the state’s billion-dollar tourism industry.”

    The bill also allows private licensing agents to collect a higher service charge for processing boat registrations (up to $5, formerly $1.50) and boat ramp certificates (up to $1.50, formerly $0.75).

    Officially, the bill affects Delaware Code Title 23, “Navigation and Waters,” subsections 2112 and 2113.

    The full legislation is online at www.legis.delaware.gov (search for GA 148, SB 261).

    Delaware boating information is online at www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/Boating/Pages/Delaware_Boating_Registration.as....


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    Finally armed with official statistics, South Bethany has doubled the hours in which the Cat Hill traffic barricade is in place.

    Effective immediately, all eastbound traffic is prohibited from entering Black Gum Drive from Kent Avenue, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., May 15 to Sept. 15.

    Cat Hill is a residential neighborhood west of Route 1, increasingly being used as a shortcut for beach-bound traffic trying to avoid Route 26.

    “We all have witnessed the transportation problems that we’ve had here,” said John Janowski, such as speeding, disregard for stop signs and insufficient speed humps, as well as heavy volume on beach-weather days.

    Janowski heads the South Bethany ad-hoc Traffic Committee, which was formed in April and receives advisement from the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT)

    “What you have is neighborhood streets between the major arterial, Route 1 [and Route 26] and the major collectors to the west [Kent Avenue, Double Bridges Road]. Unfortunately, most of those neighborhood streets are not built to the design and specifications of a collector road,” Janowski said.

    “Because of our geography, there’s only three or four east-west opportunities to go from Ocean View to Route 1,” Janowski added. “We are further inconvenienced by the fact that … the shortest path … is, unfortunately, our community.”

    Those busier roads are averaging 10,000 or 20,000 vehicles per day, at least (that’s a year-round average). Cat Hill has seen nearly 3,000 during the highest-traffic periods in recent studies.

    So the town council voted unanimously on July 8 to double the barricade hours and lengthen the season.

    Cat Hill’s citizen traffic committee had previously noted that 5,500 as-yet-un-built homes have been approved for the area.

    But Janowski said a 2006 traffic study (done just before the economy fell flat) envisioned more than 9,200 housing units, a new golf course and hundreds of thousands of square feet of new retail and office space. That elicited an exclamation of shock from at least one resident.

    “There’s little supply, in terms of highway, and much in terms of demand,” Janowski said.

    For instance, compared to the entrances of many housing developments, Black Gum Drive is about half the size and lacks any sidewalks.

    But anywhere from 21 to 51 percent of the traffic uses Cat Hill as a shortcut, according to a traffic study from Saturday of Memorial Day weekend. (That study didn’t differentiate on whether the drivers were tourists cutting through or other South Bethany residents destined for homes in other parts of town.)

    Besides basic traffic counts, DelDOT has performed speed, volume and origin/destination studies.

    DelDOT had another traffic study scheduled for July 8 and 9, on whether the traffic warrants a three-way stop at Canal Drive and Tamarack Road.

    Some quick-fix changes were already made to better mark the intersection and slow cars down.

    Neighboring Bethany Beach also loaned the Town “the ultimate cup of sugar,” said Mayor Pat Voveris, in the form of a temporary speed hump, which sticks up at a sharp, more effective angle, than the existing speed humps, which aren’t up to regulatory standards.

    The Traffic Committee has a full workload for the time being.

    “We’ve had three meetings; they’re three hours. I’m lucky if I can get through half the agenda,” Janowski said.

    They’re discussing easy ideas that can be accomplished quickly, but they’ll mull over bigger ideas, such as sidewalks or de-annexation.

    “I’m not prepared to talk tonight about how we’re going to implement these traffic-control measures,” Janowski said. “We will evaluate, and to the best of our means. We’re not a professional staff. We’re an assemblage. We have guidance from DelDOT at this point.”

    “The things that we’re doing now are the low-hanging fruit,” said Councilwoman Carol Stevenson. “Really, the most important thing that we need to look at is safety. It’s critically important that walkers are safe. … That’s not a low-hanging fruit right now. That’s difficult.”

    For instance, sidewalk planning and funding can take three years, based on previous projects, said Town Manager Melvin Cusick.

    Discussion has also touched on whether South Bethany property owners can bypass the barricade, forcing outsiders to take the long way around. But that hearkens back to earlier discussions: if the road is privatized, DelDOT will reduce the public roadway funding to the Town.

    Mike Trentadue said he wanted to erase the misconception that the only people inconvenienced by the barricade live outside of Cat Hill.

    “We share the inconvenience as much as anyone else — in fact, probably more — coming down Kent Avenue, seeing your house and having to go around. But it’s the right thing to do for the right reason.”

    Even Mayor Pat Voveris, who lives east of Route 1, said she’ll have to plan her trips around the barricade.

    “We’re headed toward good things. We’re making progress,” said Voveris. “We want to be sure of where we’re going, [not just knee-jerk respond to] people who are squawking.”

    Citizen Dennis Roberts, a prominent voice on traffic issues, thanked the council for addressing the issues.

    “It’s an inconvenience for people that don’t live on the path. It’s a disaster for those that do,” Roberts said. For residents, a constant fear of traffic was “not what we bought into.”

    There was discussion of lengthening the barricade period to 2 p.m., but the council defeated that motion, 4-3, thereby following the preferences of DelDOT, the Traffic Committee and SB Police Department.

    Town staff said they expect police will have to man the barricade initially, to train the public not to enter during those hours. Drivers who violated the barricade previously were fined $25. When police miss a perpetrator, they usually hear about it from vigilant citizens, Police Chief Troy Crowson quipped.

    In other South Bethany news:

    • Overhead electrical lines seem to litter the skies, a source of frustration for many residents. Although the Planning Commission’s Dick Oliver said to never expect those lines to move underground, it looks like some of them will just be flat-out removed.

    Mediacom has agreed to come in autumn and remove some of the dead, unused wires, while Verizon has already begun. Until then, the wires aren’t dangerous, just an eyesore.

    • Criminal complaints have been up, but the sol-called “June Bugs” were essentially not a problem, Crowson said of the annual student house rentals.

    • South Bethany police officers have worn body armor for years, Crowson said in response to concerns for police officers’ safety after the recent police killings in Dallas, Texas.

    • Some people have posted unofficial “Do not block the walkway” parking signs, officials noted. Police said those are not official or enforceable. Drivers can usually tell which signs are not official because the signs are on private property instead of the public right-of-way. People can park there, or call the police station to ask for clarification.

    • People who have left their cars unlocked have suffered break-ins in South Bethany and Middlesex Beach. Police reminded people to prevent thefts by locking their vehicles.

    Residents with security cameras are also being invited to inform the SBPD, in case footage could be used to help solve crimes in the neighborhoods.

    • The beach patrol won second place in a recent Sea Colony Lifeguard Challenge.

    • Independence Day was a success, as the Town’s float won its third consecutive Best in Show award at the Bethany Beach parade. Also the town’s own boat parade attracted hundreds of spectators.

    “If you missed it, you really missed a good time,” Stevenson said.

    • A waste disposal truck broke down, resulting in delayed recycling and trash pickups this week. When this happens, the trucks will return immediately the next day, whether it’s a scheduled pickup or not, officials noted.

    The town council’s next workshop is Thursday, July 28, at 2 p.m.


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    After holding a special meeting this week to focus solely on signage regulations, the Sussex County Council has seemingly addressed all items related to its recently introduced sign ordinance.

    Following months of working-group meetings, council discussions and public hearings, an ordinance to amend the code related to signs was introduced in April. However, those involved with the working group voiced concern that the introduced ordinance was not a proper reflection of their discussions.

    As a result, a number of area signage companies hired Georgetown attorney David Hutt of Morris, James, Wilson, Halbrook & Bayard LLP, who also served on the working group, to create an alternate ordinance.

    Since the presentation of the alternate ordinance, the council and County staff have been going through the ordinance item by item to review the differences between the introduced ordinance, the alternate ordinance and what was recommended by the Planning & Zoning Commission.

    The council wrapped up outstanding questions posed by staff at Tuesday’s special meeting. At that time, it was decided that on-premises signs may be vacant for six months past the expiration date of their permits without a new application in the queue before they would be considered “abandoned.”

    Councilman George Cole continued his campaign to ban electronic message centers (EMCs) on two-lane roads within the county. Councilwoman Joan Deaver was also in support of the idea.

    “I am opposed to the whole idea,” said Council President Michael Vincent of banning EMCs on all two-lane roads. He added that the council had not received documents to show that signs were a distraction and the cause of accidents.

    “I believe they are distracting,” added Cole. “I think they’re unsightly. I think they’re distracting.”

    Arlett agreed with Vincent, stating that business owners should have the opportunity to choose where they invest their money.

    “Business owners make educated decisions on where to invest their money… and on a two-lane road that is rural, they’re not going to be putting a $100,000-plus billboard there, because they could never pay for it,” added Councilman Rob Arlett. “On a rural two-lane road, it’s not going to happen.”

    “Have you been through Millville lately?” asked Cole.

    “That’s not rural, that’s not rural,” responded Arlett. “Millville is not rural anymore. I’m sorry, it is not.”

    Cole said he wanted to raise the standards in Sussex County, stating that towns such as Millville, Millsboro and Bethany Beach have banned billboards.

    Vincent, Arlett and Councilman Sam Wilson agreed that EMCs should be allowed on two-lane roads.

    As for on-premises EMCs, “animation,” such as fading and dissolving, would be permitted under the proposed ordinance, while flashing, streaming and real-time video would be prohibited. The message displayed must be fixed for a period of at least 10 seconds, with a transition time of 1 second.

    Currently, there is no separation distance requirement between off-premises and on-premises EMCs in the County’s code. Cole stated he didn’t believe the two should be allowed on the same parcel of land.

    Conversions of non-conforming off-premises signs to off-premises EMCs are to be prohibited.

    Non-conforming off-premises signs would be allowed to be repaired or replaced in the event of a natural disaster, but could not be bigger or taller than they were prior to being destroyed. The sign owner could apply for a front-yard and side-yard setback variance.

    For the replacement of existing off-premises signs, however, they may not be greater in size or height than what the code allows. The sign owner may apply for a front-yard and side-yard setback variance on them as well.

    Periodic maintenance of non-conforming off-premises signs will be allowed, unless abandoned.

    County staff were asked to make the changes to the introduced ordinance and bring it back before the council. Each change will be read individually as an amendment to the introduced ordinance.

    Currently, there is a moratorium placed on the acceptance of applications of off-premises signs within the county. That is set to expire on Aug. 15. The Sussex County Council will next meet on Tuesday, July 19, at 10 a.m.


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    Kelsey Elise Murray and Mikaela Brosnahan, incoming juniors at Indian River High School, recently returned from representing their school and the state of Delaware at the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Mass.

    The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields.

    The pair joined students from across the nation to hear Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners talk about leading medical research, get advice from Ivy League and medical school deans on what to expect in medical school, listen to stories from patients considered medical miracles, hear from teen medical science prodigies and learn about advances in medicine.

    Students are nominated to represent their schools and states by teachers, counselors and principals who serve on the National Academy of Future Physicians & Medical Scientists’ Honorary Board of Educators, based on academic excellence, leadership potential and commitment to entering the medical field as physicians or medical scientists (biomedical, technological, engineering and mathematics).


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